TutorMe homepage
Subjects
PRICING
COURSES
SIGN IN
Start Free Trial
Mala M.
Tutor for eight years
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee
Trigonometry
TutorMe
Question:

What is theorem is the basis for the fundamental or first trigonometric identity?

Mala M.
Answer:

In middle school, everyone learns of Pythagoras theorem which is the sum of the squares of the two sides of a right triangle adds up to be the square of the hypotenuse. If both sides of this pythagoras equation is divided by the square of the hypotenuse, then what you essentially get is that the sum of the squares of the sine and cosine of an angle in the right triangle adds up to be 1.

Calculus
TutorMe
Question:

Why should finding the slope of a function and the area under it be the basic aspects of calculus?

Mala M.
Answer:

Basic arithmetic started with addition and subtraction. Then, it advanced into multiplication (As successive addition of the same number) and division (successive subtraction of the same number). In calculus (this will be clearer with a graph or drawing), we use infinitesimally small quantities for multiplication (or essential area or integration) and for division (essentially the tangent of the curve at that point). Hence basic arithmetic operations of division and multiplication of infinitesimally small quantities in an asymptotic limit leads to the definition of the basic calculus operations - namely - differentiation and integration

Physics
TutorMe
Question:

You are given these two balls, each tied to a meter long string of insignificant weight, on your either hands. Ball A - a heavy metal ball with a size like that of a ping pong ball Ball B - a lighter but larger basket ball. You gently swing ball A so that it oscillates covering an angle of 5 degrees on either side of the vertical. You swing ball B with more strength so that it oscillates an angle of 20 degrees on either side of the vertical. Which ball will have a longer period of oscillation and why?

Mala M.
Answer:

The laws of oscillation of a pendulum states that for small enough oscillations and for an insignificant length of the string, the time period of the oscillation is independent of (a) the mass, size, shape, density of the pendulum (ball at the end of the string) (b) the amplitude of the oscillation. The equation for time period T is (derived/ proved in detail) to be 2* pi * sqrt(l/g) where l is the length of the pendulum. Since both balls A and B are tied with a meter long string (same length), they both will have the same period of oscillation.

Send a message explaining your
needs and Mala will reply soon.
Contact Mala
Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Session
FAQs
What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Session" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.