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Nathaniel Q.
Advanced Medical Honor Student
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Culinary Arts
TutorMe
Question:

How do I make my meringue keep its hard peeks and prevent my meringue from falling?

Nathaniel Q.
Answer:

First off, you want to insure that when you're separating the whites and yolks that you have very clean hands. The oil from your fingers can disrupt the process. Just gently pour the eggs back and forth between the shell halves until almost all of the white is removed without breaking the yolk. I like to separate the egg in one bowl and then split the whites and yolks into two other bowls, just to make sure no yolk contaminates the whites. Secondly, you are going to want to use a stainless steal or copper bowl to whip the whites. Plastic bowls can have hidden oils and residues that can disturb the whites. Lastly, put a dash or two of cream of tartar into the whites when they are around a soft peak. This helps prevent over whipping and stabilizes the small bubbles that you're making in the whites. After utilizing these tips, you should have a nice and firm meringue perfect for pies, cookies, souffles, and even french macaroons. (Tip: Never use whites from a carton. They have additives that drastically impact the formation of meringue.)

Anatomy
TutorMe
Question:

What are the names of the cranial nerves and how do I know which one of them does what?

Nathaniel Q.
Answer:

There are 12 cranial nerves emerging mainly from the brain stem. Each nerve leads to a different part of the body allowing for very specialized functions to be controlled. The 12 nerves from the top-down anatomically along with their type (M - Motor, S - Sensory, B - both) are as follows: I. Olfactory Nerve (S) II. Optic Nerve (S) III. Oculomoter Nerve (M) IV. Trochlear Nerve (M) V. Trigeminal Nerve (B) VI. Abducens Nerve (M) VII. Facial Nerve (B) VIII. Vestibulocochlear Nerve (S) XI. Glossopharyngeal Nerve (B) X. Vagus Nerve (B) XI. Spinal Accessory Nerve (M) XII. Hypoglossal Nerve (M) The Mnemonic to remember the order of the nerves is: I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII (O)h (O)h (O)h (T)o (T)ouch (A)nd (F)eel (V)intage (G)reen (V)elvet, (S)imply (H)eaven. The Mnemonic to remember the function of the nerves is: I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII (S)ome (S)ay (M)oney (M)atters, (B)ut (M)y (B)rother (S)ays (B)ig (B)rains (M)atter (M)ore

Algebra
TutorMe
Question:

How would I solve multi-variable linear equations? Ex.) 2 x + 5 y = 10 5 x + 10 y = 20

Nathaniel Q.
Answer:

There are two methods in solving these equations, Elimination and Substitution. In this example, we will work with the easier of the methods, Elimination. First, you must know that you're looking for the values of both X and Y, we are going to solve for one variable and then the other. Elimination Method: Eq.) 2 x + 5 y = 10 5 x + 10 y = 20 Step 1 - Take a look at both equations and see which one has the lower values, then compare it to the higher value equation and find the lowest common denominator (LCD) either values X or Y, but not both. In this example, when looking for X, the lower equation is 2 x + 5 y = 10 and the LCD is 2. Now, multiply that equation by the LCD: ( 2 x + 5 y = 10 ) * 2 => 4 x + 10 y = 20 (Note: This kind of multiplication is permissible, because both sides of the equation or multiplied equally, which mean the values if X and Y didn't change) Step 2 - Write both the equations out so that one is on top of the other. Generally you will keep the lower value equation on top even after you multiply it by the LCD. This setup allows you to easily calculate this step. Once they have been written out, you will subtract the top equation out of the bottom equation. 4 x + 10 y = 20 <---- Top Equation 5 x + 10 y = 20 <---- Bottom Equation x + 0y = 0 <---- Equation after subtraction You can see here that I subtracted the coefficients from the top equation out the coefficients in the bottom equation. Now, you have solved for the value of X. X = 0 Step 3 - Solve for Y. This time, we do not need to do what we just did, but simply plug and play. We are going to Substitute the value of x into either one of the equations. 2 x + 5 y = 10 2 (0) + 5 y = 10 0 + 5 y = 10 5 y = 10 y = 10/5 y = 2 You now have the value to both variables: Y = 2 and X = 0

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