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Prateek R.
Electrical Engineer
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TOEFL
TutorMe
Question:

How well should you do to score well in the speaking section on toefl ibt?

Prateek R.
Answer:

First let me point out that my biggest tip for getting a good English test score is to not do the TOEFL exam. The IELTS exam is just as widely accepted as the TOEFL. Most Universities will accept both TOEFL and IELTS exam results. If you have the choice, opt for IELTS. The TOEFL exam is complicated and confusing. It does give a good idea of the students score, especially for the higher level students, but it does make it difficult for the student to actually practice for the exam. If feel the TOEFL is particularly hard on students who are average giving them below average scores. Anyway, lets look at how to boost your TOEFL score by a few marks. For those reading this who may be unfamiliar with the exam. The TOEFL iBT test requires the students to use headphones and microphone to make several short speeches of 15 to 60 seconds each based on a given topic. The topic might be a straight question or it may be a response to a reading article or listening section. Unlike IELTS exams, in TOELF there is on examiner with whom you converse. Instead you have to make your speech to the computer which records it and sends it to an examiner thousands of miles away at a marking centre. It is rather cold and impersonal. My advice would be to practice speaking as you would in the test. Set up your computer with headphones and microphone and record yourself making speeches. Listen back and try to pick up where you can improve. Some common mistakes I see are simple things. For example: Speaking too fast - when your nervous in an exam people and go to quick and mess up their pronunciation. Mumbling - without someone in front of you, and with other people in the room, you might not speak loudly enough or clearly enough. Talk to the microphone as if you are talking to someone several metres away form you in the room. Poor posture - Sit up straight, chin up and breath fully. If you are slouching at the desk it will affect the quality of your speech. No confidence - Can you confidently use your English language skills. Be brave and don't disappear inside yourself with shyness. Lack of confidence leads to mumbling, awkward pauses and eh um eh. Showing off with fancy vocabulary you don't know well - Don't try to show how good you are by using some word that you only half learned. You'll only end up using it incorrectly or mess up the grammar and show that you don't know something. Show of how well you know things not how much you don't know things. Stopping early/late - if the time given is for 30 seconds then do 30 seconds. Not 28 and not 32 but 30. This is most critical on the long questions and the short questions. With the short question you need to be careful that you actually manage to get to the point in the time and don't waste time. With the long questions you need to fill out the time fully and plan what you are going to say. Forget to use paper - you have paper and pencil in the exam and you can make notes. Do so. Not long sentences. Short notes. I teach my students to make mind maps to prepare their answers. This helps keep the logic and flow of your answer cohesive and stops you wandering off topic. It also serves to remind you of what info the source article/tape said.

Hindi
TutorMe
Question:

Is Hindi a dying language?

Prateek R.
Answer:

Yes, Sarkari and academic Hindi is a dying language but as a language of masses and as a common language of spoken communication it is thriving . OP has not meant any offence but this is a question which genuine lovers of any language do ask for the simple reason that globally English is becoming increasingly important and English words and phrases are finding a place in all living languages. If we love someone we do worry about its future well being! By Sarkari Hindi I mean the version as promoted and imposed by the official Department of Hindi Language, Government of India. I am a native Hindi speaker who has learnt this language upto class 10th. Still today I cannot understand fully the official communications in so called Official Hindi which keeps on adding newer words derived from Sanskrit. A language dies when it is hijacked by the extremists and its normal speakers are unable to understand the new version and they need select interpreters to comprehend.

Electrical Engineering
TutorMe
Question:

What are the courses you should be very good at if you want to be a good electrical and electronics engineer?

Prateek R.
Answer:

There are two kinds of courses; theoretical and practical. While many of the lessons learned from practical courses fall out of usage with the passage of time, the theoretical changes much more slowly. For example, I can assembly language program a Z80. I can use a slide rule. I used to be able to read the resistor code on a carbon resistor. There isn't much need for any of those skills these days in a professional environment. However, I am also a good circuit designer, which has never stopped being an important skill and only becomes better with age. The bottom line is that a good theoretical course will withstand the test of time whereas many practical courses will slowly become less useful. Get a good theoretical background and gain enough practical experience in fundamental aspects to understand how to use the theoretical stuff. The remainder will be learned on the job. For example, knowing the op codes for a Z80 is not so useful whereas knowing the basics of assembly language programming is useful. Knowing the dark corners of a particular microprocessor architecture is not so useful over the long haul whereas knowing the common elements between all microprocessors would be. Knowing at least one object oriented programming language is useful. Some tools such as SPICE have withstood the test of time and are not likely to be replaced anytime soon. Basic courses such as circuit design and electromagnetics change very slowly. People still interface sensors with a wheatstone bridge and use opamps for signal conditioning. People still design microwave circuits using distributed element circuits. Digital logic design has not fundamentally changed since the introduction of HDL's. So for any course you take, if it spends a lot of time on a specific instance of design, it has less usefulness than something that is generic or theoretical to a class of design.

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