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Tutor profile: Lara F.

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Lara F.
Masters Student in Political Economy, BA from UC Berkeley
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Questions

Subject: German

TutorMe
Question:

What is the best strategy to improve my German?

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Lara F.
Answer:

German is a difficult language, with complicated grammar rules and three different articles, which simply must be memorized. Since memorizing all German articles by heart is almost impossible, the best way to remember them is by practicing as much as possible. Expose yourself to the language. When you learn a new word, use it in a sentence multiple times. Write down this sentence. Repeat this sentence. Record yourself saying this sentence and listen to it again. If this method does not work for you, and you want to learn the language more completely over time, I recommend listening to audiobooks in German. This will improve your grammar significantly. Watching movies or TV shows in German could also help, especially with subtitles; however, the speaking might be too fast and at times very colloquial. Another good way to practice what you've learned is to speak with a native speaker on a regular basis.

Subject: Pre-Algebra

TutorMe
Question:

I struggle to understand word problems. How can I improve this?

Inactive
Lara F.
Answer:

For word problems, it is always best to write down what you know from the question, and then go from there. Try to visualize what the question is asking and how to solve it. It is often helpful to give letter names to values. For example, the value that you are trying to find can be x - the unknown. Other values that you know can be named after what they are, for example when the question is about prices, you can use O for original price and S for sale price. The best thing you can do when you are struggling with Math problems is to practice and train your brain. Once you practice something many times and start to get it right, your confidence will also increase and it will get easier.

Subject: Basic Math

TutorMe
Question:

I have difficulties with understanding and solving questions relating to percentages. How can I improve this?

Inactive
Lara F.
Answer:

Percentage questions can oftentimes be tricky. But have no fear, anybody can learn to master percentages! And this is actually an aspect of Math that you can definitely see and use in the real world (discounts, interest rates, etc). Percentages can best be understood when picturing them, for example as a pizza pie. The entire pizza = 100%. That means that 100% = 1 pizza pie. Percentages are expressed out of 100. So 100% would be 100/100, 35% would be 35/100. If you increase something by 8%, you would be adding 8% of pizza to your existing pizza pie. The way to calculate this is to first find out how much 8% of your pie is, and then add that to your existing full pie. If you are to reduce the pie by 8%, you would simply calculate 8% of your pie and then take that away, and be left with (100-8)=92% of pie. Let's do a tricky percentage question: If the price of gas increases by 25% and Sam intends to spend only an additional 15% on gas, by how much will he reduce the quantity of petrol purchased? Since you are working with percentages here, you can simply make up an amount for the price of gas originally. So let us assume that the price of gas was $1 per liter. Now the price increased by 25%. 25% of 1$ is (25/100 x 1)= $0.25. Add that to the original price and we get the new price of gas = (1+0.25) = $1.25. However, Sam only wants to spend an additional 15%, so he only wants to go up to (15/100 x 1) = $0.15 -> add to the original price of $1 -> 1+0.15= $1.15 So Sam only wants to spend $1.15, but the price per liter is now $1.25. Let's replace one liter of gas with our pizza pie, to make it easier to visualize. A whole pizza pie now costs $1.25, but Sam can only spend $1.15. So how much of the pizza can he afford? To get the answer, we must divide 1.15 by 1.25. This will give us the percentage of what he can afford. 1.15/1.25 = 92%. With the new price, Sam can only get 92% of the pizza pie. So how much is his quantity purchased being reduced? For this, you subtract what he originally bought (one pizza pie) by what he can afford now (92% of the pizza pie). The answer is (100-92)=8 percent.

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