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Rebecca G.
Tutor for three years
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Writing
TutorMe
Question:

What is a thesis?

Rebecca G.
Answer:

A thesis is the one message you want readers to know. The goal is to prove that the thesis statement is true. Details should prove main points, and main points should prove the thesis. The thesis for a how-to essay might be that people should not be so intimidated about learning coding, because it isn't as hard as many people think. Main points to support that thesis might include easily available resources for getting stated, a demonstration of how easy it is to write a code, and demonstrating how advanced coding is simply building on what has already been learned.

English
TutorMe
Question:

How can I know if I should use two, too, or to?

Rebecca G.
Answer:

Two is the number. You could remember the "w" by labeling it the "weird" two, since it's both a number and a word. Too is like "also'. You can remember this by thinking "too much milk" has an extra o. It tags along. To is usually used right before a verb (to go), after a verb (run to). If it's not a number or usd lik an also, it's going to be "to."

Education
TutorMe
Question:

What is a sentence?

Rebecca G.
Answer:

Think of words in a sentence like railway cars in a train. Lets say that a train needs at least two cars, or else it isn't a train. One car pulls, the other follows. /____/ /____/. Sentences have a noun and a verb. Less than that is not a sentence (unless it's a command, like Go!) Like trains, more cars can be added before, between, and after those two cars, but every train has at least those two cars. For example: /He/ /came/. /Noun/ /Verb/. A longer sentence would look like this: /I/ /want/ /that/ /cookie/ /now/! /Noun/ /Verb/ /Article/ /direct object/ /preposition/! Every sentence has a “thing” and an “action” or “description”. In other words, it has a noun (person, place, thing, or idea), and a verb (action or state of being). Nouns are often thing you can touch, places you can be, people or things all around you. Touch something. That’s a noun! Everything around you is a noun! Verbs are things you can do. Touch your nose. Stand up. Jump in place. Sit down. Be still. Those are verbs! How else can you tell which is the noun, and which is the verb? Draw a picture! Here’s a sentence: Sally went to the store for some bread. If you draw a picture, what will you draw first? A girl, Sally. Next you’ll draw the store, then some bread in her hand. So our nouns are Sally, store, and bread. Which one is DOING something? Sally! What is she doing? Act it out! You would probably start pretending to walk or drive, right? So, look at the sentence and tell me which word is the action? WENT! Some nouns can’t be touched. Those are ideas, like Love. I’ve never touched a thing called love, but I’ve felt it inside. It’s a thing you can’t touch, but still a "thing". Freedom, fear, hope, and smells are similar untouchable nouns.

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