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Nat S.
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Literature
TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between third-person limited and third-person omniscient narration?

Nat S.
Answer:

Both points of view fall in the category of third person narration, but they are still quite different. In third-person limited narration, the narrator is (you guessed it) limited to just one character. For example, in the Harry Potter series, narration is primarily limited to Harry’s perspective; the narrator is able to tell us what Harry is thinking and feeling, but not Ron, Dumbledore, or Trevor the Toad. In third person limited narration, however, the narrator has much more information about the thoughts and feelings of many different characters, and may switch between the perspectives of different characters. This practice is sometimes colloquially called head-jumping, as though you’re inside the head of one character, before jumping to the head of a different one. Third person omniscient is less common in contemporary fiction than third person limited, but one popular example is Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code. There are also many examples in classic literature such as Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter.

Gender Studies
TutorMe
Question:

What was first wave feminism, and what was its primary demand?

Nat S.
Answer:

Feminism as a social movement is divided into “waves”––in this case defined as periods of feminist activism and critical thought, often differentiated from one another by their philosophical approaches and the primary goals of their activism. First-wave wave generally refers to the period of feminist social activism in the 19th and early 20th centuries. This period is often considered the beginning of feminism as a movement (it is not, however, the beginning of feminist thought; many people expressed ideas we would consider “feminist” long before the 19th century.) First-wave feminism, unlike later iterations, focused primarily on legal issues affecting women. Arguably the most important of these was women’s suffrage (the right to vote.) American women were given this right with the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution in 1920. However, because of deep-seated racial inequalities and the prevalence of Jim Crow laws in the South, it was primarily white women who were able to exercise the newly granted right.

English
TutorMe
Question:

What is juxtaposition and what purpose does it serve rhetorically?

Nat S.
Answer:

Juxtaposition is when two ideas or images are placed side by side or close together for the purpose of comparison and contrast. Juxtaposition is a phrase sometimes used in art, as well as English and rhetoric. For example, if you saw a painting with a black bear standing in front of a snowy background, you could say that the dark color of the bear is juxtaposed against the white of the snow. The fact that the two are placed so close together makes the differences between them stand out more. In English, writers can use juxtaposition as a rhetorical device, just like the painter used it in his painting. Remember: a rhetorical device is a specific strategy that a writer can use to help persuade her audience. We can see juxtaposition used this way in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech. King’s goal in this speech was, in part, to persuade America to take action against the racial inequalities that plagued the country. One of the ways he does this is by juxtaposing what life is like for Black Americans, in comparison to the lives of whites, who enjoyed far more legal and economic privileges. Consider the following lines, excerpted from the speech: “Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood.” (King, n.p.) Here, King uses two sets of juxtaposing metaphors in order to highlight the danger that segregation and racial injustice poses to the nation: the “dark and desolate valley of segregation” is juxtaposed against the “sunlit path of racial justice,” and in the next sentence, the “quicksands of racial injustice” is juxtaposed with the “solid rock of brotherhood.” Works Cited King, Martin L., Jr. "I Have a Dream." Speech. Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D.C. 28 Aug. 1963. American Rhetoric. Web. 26 Dec. 2016.

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