Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Shimolee J.

Inactive
Shimolee J.
Legal Consultant
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What are the fundamental requirements for being a good writer?

Inactive
Shimolee J.
Answer:

There are three very important things to keep in mind while trying to be a good writer or improve your writing: 1) Keep a constant check on your grammar, spelling, and sentence formation. 2) Read. Be it story books, magazines, autobiographies or anything that you like, so that you can understand the different nuances associated with different types of writing. 3) Proof-read your drafts time and again (sometimes even loudly to hear what it sounds like), or better yet, get an editor or someone you know who writes well to vet your drafts. There can truly never be a time when you can master the art of writing. But, if you can grasp the basics properly, you will be well on your way to becoming a good writer.

Subject: English as a Second Language

TutorMe
Question:

What are called "articles" in the English language, and how must they be used?

Inactive
Shimolee J.
Answer:

Articles are usually adjectives, that are used to refer to nouns in a sentence. There are three articles in the English language. "A", "An", and "The". "A" - "A" is used to refer to any singular (one) noun from a group of nouns, such as one person or one thing. Examples: 1) She bought "a" bagel from the shop. 2) "A" boy stood by the door. "An" - As with "A", "An" is also used to refer to any noun from a group of nouns, except that it is only used when the noun it refers to begins with a vowel (A, E, I, O, U). Examples: 1) Jane bought "an" encyclopedia from the mall. 2) "An" apple a day keeps the doctor away. "The" - "The" is used to refer to a specific noun or a group of nouns. Examples: 1) "The" boys played in the park all day. 2) She did not like "the" rain.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between "their", "there", and "they're"?

Inactive
Shimolee J.
Answer:

There is a fundamental difference between "their", "there", and "they're". "Their" is an adjective. It is a reference to determine ownership of objects or virtues belonging to two or more people. Examples: 1) Jane and John are selling "their" furniture. 2) Jane and John are known for "their" kindness. "There" can be used as an adjective and a noun. It is a reference often used to describe a place or situation. Examples: [As an adjective] 1) Jane is always "there" for John. [As a noun] 2) You can take it from "there". "They're" is a combination of two words - "They + are". It is a reference to indicate a group of people or things. Examples: 1) "They're" going to the movies tonight. 2) "They're" really tasty doughnuts.

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Shimolee will reply soon.
Contact Shimolee

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.