Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Denya C.

Inactive
Denya C.
Experienced tutor in English and Spanish
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: Spanish

TutorMe
Question:

When do you use Preterite and when do you use the Imperfect in Spanish?

Inactive
Denya C.
Answer:

It can be difficult to figure out when you use Preterite versus Imperfect in Spanish. I like to use this acronym, SAFE WATERS to differentiate the uses between the two tenses. http://profesoradunkley.weebly.com/uploads/1/3/4/4/13444339/safe_waters.pdf Preterite is used when you are talking about an action that is done and completed, the beginning or end of an action, or a specific time period. Imperfect is more fluid, it describes the setting of the action, drops you in the middle of the action (you do not know when it began), and describes habitual actions (every Friday we used to eat dinner at Red Lobster).

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

How does Chaucer define masculinity in his works?

Inactive
Denya C.
Answer:

Throughout Troilus and Criseyde Chaucer presents opposing views of masculinity. The first view of masculinity that is featured is the comportment of Troilus in book I. As the text opens there is a long passage in which Troilus is observing the lovesick knights, his peers, in the temple and he criticizes them for their weak behavior in wooing the fair ladies in the temple. At this point in the text the reader sees Troilus as arrogant and narcissistic knight who is diametrically opposed to the concept of love and all it entails. Troilus sees love as emasculating, especially for a soldier whose job it is to embody masculinity and protect his fellow man and country. Troilus’ diatribe on the disdain and embarrassment that the ridiculousness of love proves to be on a man continues, and at this point Troilus can be seen as a poor embodiment of masculinity. He believes himself to be superhuman, above all emotion and strictly rational in contrast to the weak and emotion driven lovesick knights. To be masculine and a true knight in medieval times, one had to rectify the violent tendencies needed to be successful in war and the instinctual need for the boundaries of society and more sympathetic human emotions. Because Troilus lacks the rectification of these two needs, he can be seen as less of a male and less of a knight as well. The second view of masculinity which describes the male courtly lover is seen not only in Book I, but continues after Troilus’ transformation. In Book I, the very knights that Troilus mocks are shown wooing their beloveds in the temple before the meeting begins. Not only are they overly attentive to the object of their affection but also recite poetry or song to them in a show of respectful reverence. These suitors can successfully cast of the spoils and gore of war and participate in a mitigating and humanistic expression of emotion. This restrained and respectful show of emotion demonstrates the full facet of masculine emotional capacity as the knights are successful on the battlefield but are able to compartmentalize their violent experiences and assimilate into society through the conventions of courtly love. Troilus himself will experience this assimilation after he is struck with the arrow of love and falls in love with Criseyde. The prior notion of masculinity that Troilus previously embodied is transformed into an extreme version of the very type of masculinity that he had mocked and ostracized his fellow knights for displaying. Once transformed, some critics agree that the solipsism that Troilus displayed subsides and that this change allows him to become humanized. Troilus begins to feel the same lovesickness he despised, which, in contrast to the mocked knights, becomes all consuming for Troilus. From book II onward he cannot participate in society and isolates himself in his room to lament over his lovesickness and feelings for the distant Criseyde. This shows an extreme case of the male courtly lover in which instead of allowing him to participate in medieval society Troilus’ lovesickness has the opposite effect and forces him outside of society. In addition, Troilus uses sleep to be closer to his love, and he is consumed by sleep as it is the only time Troilus’ feelings are expressed and not suppressed. While dreaming of one’s love is perfectly natural, Troilus’ dreams are usually violent and troubling causing him to cry out in frustration. This behavior, coupled with the crying and the swooning he does for much of book II is an extreme case of masculinity and courtly love behavior in a male. Troilus is so woeful of his situation that it forces him into inaction. He can barely bear to woo Criseyde in Book II and manages to earn her respect, not even her love. This is in stark contrast to the knights/suitors in the church who are able to respectfully show their love for their chosen ladies.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

How do I write a thesis statement to organize my essay?

Inactive
Denya C.
Answer:

I am a big fan of the three-pronged thesis statement, which is the most popular type of thesis statement. It gives you the order of your paragraphs within the statement, and you can easily switch up the order or content of the prongs if one paragraph is not working. Here is an example of a three pronged thesis statement: Iago in Othello, Tom in The Mill on the Floss, and Jay in The Sound and the Fury assume the roles of the ‘dangerous insider’ in each of these texts. The reader now knows that I will write a paragraph on each of these characters within my essay.

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Denya will reply soon.
Contact Denya

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.