Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Katie T.

Inactive
Katie T.
Academic Librarian
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: Natural Sciences

TutorMe
Question:

My instructor suggests that I don't search using Google. What are my other options?

Inactive
Katie T.
Answer:

While Google can be a great place to start, it is generally difficult to narrow down your search to find peer-reviewed, credible sources and find articles that have full text. An alternative is to use your library's databases. These databases allow you to search through all of the articles your library subscribes to.

Subject: Environmental Science

TutorMe
Question:

My professor says that I need to find an article in a peer-reviewed journal for my Environmental Science class. What's the difference between scholarly and peer-reviewed journals?

Inactive
Katie T.
Answer:

A publication is regarded as scholarly if it is authored by experts, for experts. The publication is academic in focus as it reports original research (experimentation), research methodology or theory. Prior to publication, articles are submitted and go through a rigorous assessment that involves review and approval by the author’s peers (experts in the same subject area). Peer reviewed serials publish articles only if they have passed through the official editorial process. The peer review and evaluation system is utilized to safeguard, maintain, and improve the quality of scholarly materials published in serials. While not all scholarly journals go through the peer review process, it is usually safe to assume that a peer reviewed journal is also scholarly.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between primary and secondary sources?

Inactive
Katie T.
Answer:

A primary source provides direct or firsthand evidence about an event, object, person, or work of art. Primary sources include historical and legal documents, eyewitness accounts, results of experiments, statistical data, pieces of creative writing, audio and video recordings, speeches, and art objects. A secondary source is a source that provides an analysis of documents or articles at a later date or by people who were not directly involved in the original work. Examples include textbooks, review articles, and encyclopedias.

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Katie will reply soon.
Contact Katie

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.