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Dara S.
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LSAT
TutorMe
Question:

What section of the LSAT is the most like an exam I'd actually see in law school?

Dara S.
Answer:

Believe it or not, the unscored writing sample that is given at the end of the multiple choice sections is the part of the LSAT that is the most like your future exams. Like the writing sample, you'll be given a prompt that reads more like a short story, something you have never seen before the day of the exam. From that prompt, you'll use your knowledge from class and reading past cases to analyze all of the issues. You will have a set amount of time to write about all of the possible issues and give an opinion on the likely outcome of the situation. There are some differences, too. The LSAT's writing sample doesn't require any actual legal knowledge; it usually isn't about a legal problem at all. You'll have 35 minutes to complete the writing sample; your law school exams may be limited to any time from three to 48 hours. There's no reported score for the writing sample; your single law school exam is usually the majority of your class grade, often the only grade for the whole semester. Law school admission boards almost always read writing samples because of the similarity.

GRE
TutorMe
Question:

Why don't the questions on the GRE Quantitative sections look like what I'm used to from studying math in high school and college?

Dara S.
Answer:

The GRE Quantitative section is only partially a test of your math knowledge. Unlike other standardized tests, the GRE must test the skills of a very wide range of students: from aspiring French literature professors to physical therapists. That's why the GRE Quantitative section includes unfamiliar question types like Quantitative Comparison. The GRE is as interested in a student's ability to solve unusual problems or apply new information to a set of rules as it is in actual math knowledge because problem-solving is relevant to all disciplines, not just mathe and science.

ACT
TutorMe
Question:

Why do I keep running out of time in the ACT Math section?

Dara S.
Answer:

The ACT Math section is specifically designed to be difficult to finish. There are 60 questions and 60 minutes in which to complete them - only an average of a minute per question! Remember, though, the ACT only scores right answers without a penalty for wrong answers and all questions are worth the same number of points. The key to getting the most correct answers is to work efficiently, looking for questions that are likely to take you less than a minute to do through out the section and doing those first so you have more time "banked" for questions that will take more time to answer.

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