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Tutor profile: Mai G.

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Mai G.
Tutor for Grades 6 and 7, as well as Health Sciences & Dentistry Subjects (10+ years tutor experience)
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Questions

Subject: Dentistry and Pre-Dentistry

TutorMe
Question:

What are the keys to occlusion?

Inactive
Mai G.
Answer:

Key 1 is Molar relationship: The mesiobuccal cusp of the upper first molar falls on the mesiobuccal developmental groove of the lower first molar. Key 2 is crown angulation: The gingival part of the long axis of the crown must be distal to the occlusal part of the axis. Key 3 is LLI or Labiolingual Crown Inclination: line drawn tangent to the crest of the labial surface of the crown must be perpendicular to the occlusal plane. Key 4 is rotation: none of the teeth should be rotated. Key 5 is contacts should be tight without spaces inbetween. key 6 is the Curve of Spee: Mandibular Curve of Spee must not be deeper than 1.5mm (Andrews 1972, AJO)

Subject: English as a Second Language

TutorMe
Question:

When do you use There/They’re/Their/Theirs/There’s?

Inactive
Mai G.
Answer:

This commonly causes confusion for English learners. No worries, let’s clear that up for you, shall we? Their - part of speech: pronoun kind: possessive person: 3rd person, plural use: placed before the noun. e.g. This is their classroom. Theirs - part of speech: pronoun kind: possessive person: 3rd person, plural use: placed after the noun. e.g. This classroom is theirs. There - used as an adverb, pronoun, or interjection; 1. part of speech: adverb (in spoken English) uses: to modify a verb in a sentence e.g. She went there to search for her keys. (adverb of place; “there” modifies the verb “went”) 2. part of speech: pronoun use: to introduce a subject in the sentence e.g. There were protesters outside the supreme court. 3. part of speech: interjection e.g. There, that wasn’t so hard, was it? There’s - contraction for “There is” e.g. There’s a cockroach in the kitchen. They’re - contraction for “They are” or “They were” e.g. They’re willing to spend a few more hours to finish the job.

Subject: Algebra

TutorMe
Question:

What happens to the inequality sign when you divide both sides of the inequality statement by a negative number?

Inactive
Mai G.
Answer:

The inequality sign must be switched to its opposite when dividing both sides of the equation with a negative number (e.g. ">" changes to "<"). Dividing both sides of an inequality statement by a negative number changes the values of each side, thereby changing the truth of the equation, and so we must change the sign to its opposite. Because of this, you cannot divide both sides by an UNKNOWN or a variable (which means your denominator or divisor cannot be an unknown or a variable), unless you are sure of its sign.

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