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Tutor profile: Courtney J.

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Courtney J.
High School Counselor
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Questions

Subject: SAT

TutorMe
Question:

Answer the following question: Courtney worked 25 hours last week and earned $225. How much does Courtney make if she work 38 hours this week?

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Courtney J.
Answer:

To answer this question, you need to create a simple fraction of hours over money earned. The fraction would be 25/225. To find out how much Courtney makes after 38 hours will represent X. This fraction would be 38/X. If 25/225 = 38/X, what is X? You simply would multiple 225 by 38 and divide your answer by 25. 225 x 38 = 8550. 8550 / 25 = 342. Courtney makes $342 this week if she works 38 hours.

Subject: ACT

TutorMe
Question:

Correct the sentence: Courtney is an athlete she often runs around the neighborhood.

Inactive
Courtney J.
Answer:

This sentence is a run-on sentence. A run-on sentence is a sentence that has multiple main ideas and that does not use proper punctuation. Many questions in the Reading section of the ACT will ask you to choose the correct way to write sentences and recognize run-on sentences. The correct way to write the sentence above: Courtney is an athlete. She often runs around the neighborhood. As you can see, in this sentence, there should be a period, or end of thought, punctuation after athlete.

Subject: Education

TutorMe
Question:

Research on student’s choices in post-secondary education has become a crucial part in educational research studies today. Why does research show many students are not attending post high education institutions and what are the major factors behind this finding?

Inactive
Courtney J.
Answer:

A survey was done by the W.K. Kelogg Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, and KnowledgeWorks Foundation about why students are making life changing decisions before they finish their high school careers (Gifted Child Today Magazine, 2005). The foundations found that over the past few years, student rates of post-high school education have decreased. It was found that students are stressing how they want to educate their future children on how important a college education is, yet only “33% will actually advance to a higher education institution” (2005). Many students, even the top-level students, choose to not go to college or further their education. Researchers have been looking into reason the rate of students going to college is decreasing when the students have the grades, the extracurricular, and all areas that top schools in the country are looking for in acceptance. There has been one common factor that is being found through different studies and surveys: money. Money is starting to effect the decision of whether or not the student wants to continue their education after high school, as well as which institution (4 year, 2 year, or community college, or tech school) the student will attend (Gifted Child Today Magazine, 2005). The key factor in today’s society, no matter what socioeconomic status of the student or family might be, many higher academic students, as well as their average or under-average peers, do not attend college due to the financial scare that they see after their studies would be complete. Even though finances are a major factor is life after high school choices, a research study that was conducted found that there are three additional variables that contribute to these choices as well: gender, ethnicity, and parental expectations (Lee, Almonte, & Youn, 2013). The study showed that students ethnicity only influenced whether the student would work and study at the same time, where as gender and ethnicity influenced whether the student went straight to the work force as opposed to attending higher education. With these results it was concluded that the less likely the student was to work, the higher the parents expectations of the student. This could be a contributing factor to students not wanting to attend university after high school. The pressure of parents and guardian expectations tend to have youth question themselves and whether they are “good enough.” With parent expectations influencing student decisions to pursue higher education, it is creating concern with school administrators and teachers that students, especially the above-average students, are not seeking further education after secondary schooling. Many students are seeking out jobs in their personal interest of studies to make money as fast as possible. The key to having students seek out higher education seems to be educational goal engagement during their schooling (Heckhausen et. all, 2012). With this in mind, the study also found that if occupational goal engagement was pushed on students, the students were less likely to seek out the high educational status. This shows that expressing to students that education is important, not the actual end result of a job, the more likely the student is to seek out the higher education and attend college. This shows that the students interests are more important, not the financial success. With the use of a test called WorkKeys, studies have found that an assessment such as this helps aid the student to find a path that would be successful for them, without the pressures of parent influence. WorkKeys assessment, created by the ACT, links the students knowledge to skill development that would be relative to specific work fields (Shultz & Stern, 2013). With the use of this assessment, students are able to find assess their own education and where they would be successful in the working-world, without focusing on the job itself. The focus is on the student and what he or she has knowledge on and where he or she finds interest when given different scenarios. Looking into the issue of students not attending wanting to attend college after high school, the students now should be given options as to where they can lead their lives. Each student is unique and has his or her own future and path to take. It has now become important to make sure our youth is educated on all the possible options they have after they leave the high school setting. Not only is the average high school student not fully educated on all options after high school, but there are many first-generation students who have even less resources than the average student about the next steps to take in education and their future. Research done by Melinda M. Gibbons and Marie F. Shoffner from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro found that with first generation college-bound students there are five characteristics that set these students apart from their peers who had parents attend college (2004). These characteristics include applying for college without help, preparation for college life, as well as academics, the experience will be perceived different, and personality tends to differ from both parties. College is not the only option in today’s society. Students can now pursue degrees at community colleges, 2-year education programs, study abroad, take internships, travel, volunteer, or enter the military.

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