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Tutor profile: Sara S.

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Sara S.
Law Student, B.A. in English, Minor in Legal Studies
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

I am really having trouble with active voice and passive voice. Can you help me?

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Sara S.
Answer:

Yes! No Problem! Let's start with how to spot passive verbs, you can recognize these verbs by checking the subject of the sentence. Does the subject perform the action described in the verb? If the subject did not perform the action, but instead was acted. upon, then you have a passive-voice verb. Active: The student wrote the essay. Subject Verb Object Passive: The essay was written by the student. Subject Verb Object The subject of the first sentence is the student. Did the student do what the verb describes? Did they "write"? If they did, then the sentence uses an active voice. In the second sentence, the subject is the essay. Did the essay "write"? No, because essays don't write. Therefore, you can see this sentence is in the passive voice. Hope this helped!

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

Macbeth: Fate or Free Will?

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Sara S.
Answer:

The witches in "Macbeth" are where I would start to look for answers. The witches predicted that Macbeth had an unavoidable fate. Man prides themselves on their free will, but when fate intervenes, the ability to choose is almost an illusion. However, I would look closer into whether this was truly fate, or simply Macbeth acting out the predictions because he thought he had no other choice. Don't forget to use quotes from the text to support your thesis! Hope this helps!

Subject: Pre-law

TutorMe
Question:

What should I include in my law school personal statement?

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Sara S.
Answer:

Law school personal statements are extremely different from the essay you had to write to get into undergrad. There are several strict guidelines you will want to adhere to so that your personal statement will not only stay in the "keep" pile, but stand out. (1) Definitely check if the school you are applying to has their own specific requirements for the statement. My school had a length requirement, but I have read about other schools going into detail what they want for content. (Also, make sure to change your statement's content every time you apply to a different school.) (2) Keep High School out of it. Law School does not want to know about Hight School accomplishments, I researched for hours to finally come to that conclusion and I was 100 percent right. So stick to your college experiences, awards, volunteer work, etc. in your personal statement. (3) Talk about why you want to go to law school. The over used response is "I want to help people." It is okay if that is your response too! A lawyer should want to help people. Just explain why. At what moment did you decide this was the path for you? For me, it was when I realized I just couldn't stop sticking up for people, and that if I could make a career out of it I would be the happiest person on Earth. (4) Mention why you want to go to X School. It is good to mention the school in the personal statement, because it shows the Admissions Office that you are picturing yourself at their school and how serious you are about law school. (5) After painting the picture of you walking their hallways, then you should talk about what type of law you want to practice and your future goals in said practice. Most people go into law school thinking they want one thing, but come out with an entirely different plan and it is okay if you don't have a particular area of interest. Just say it, I said I wanted to keep an open mind because there were so many areas of interest that I could try and learn from during my time at their school. It just shows you are thinking even further than school and circles back to you are serious about this. Winner, winner. Hope this helps!

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