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Tutor profile: Arielle P.

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Arielle P.
Librarian and Archivist
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Questions

Subject: Professional Development

TutorMe
Question:

What is the benefit of attending a conference?

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Arielle P.
Answer:

Professional conferences are excellent opportunities to network, receive training, exchange ideas, and learn from colleagues in your field. Conference sessions can introduce you to emerging best practices and new technologies. Conferences also keep you abreast of research trends. Presenting at a conference looks great on your CV and demonstrates that you are engaging in scholarly conversation.

Subject: Study Skills

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Question:

What is the best way to study for a big test?

Inactive
Arielle P.
Answer:

I would recommend joining a study group. You can share notes with your classmates, who might have caught something in class that you didn’t or have a stronger understanding of a concept. By sharing in the work and talking with your classmates, it can make the test less intimidating and overwhelming. It can also be a safe space to ask questions in a smaller group. If it’s clear that everybody in the group is unsure about something, you know that you’re not alone and can approach your professor/teacher as a group for guidance. You’re also less likely to get distracted because you are working with others towards a shared goal.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

My assignment requires that I cite from a primary source. How do I find one?

Inactive
Arielle P.
Answer:

Search your institution’s University Archives or Special Collections website. On most Archives/Special Collections websites, you should be able to access a list of “Finding Aids” or “Collection Guides” that offer descriptions of each collection available for research use. Finding aids are comprised of a biographical note, a scope and content section, and a box list. Skim the biographical note and scope and content to determine if a collection is relevant to your research topic. If there is a detailed box list available, skim to see if any titles look relevant to your research topic. Once you’ve identified which collection(s) or folder(s) you’re interested in viewing, visit the Archives/Special Collections reading room. Primary source research requires time and exploration, so don’t expect to find your source right away. Some of the collections might not be what you’re looking for, but you might also find something unexpected and unique. Be patient and plan for extra time. Ask an Archivist or Curator. If your research topic is undefined or you’re having trouble navigating the Archives/Special Collections website, consider speaking with the Archivists/Curators on staff. Tell them what you’re thinking of researching and they will likely have suggestions for what to look at in their collections. You can go in person or send a descriptive email ahead of time. Find other repositories WorldCat and ArchivesGrid can help you locate where other archival collections live. Primary sources typically cannot be checked out or loaned, so you’ll need to travel to it. Depending on the distance, you may need to plan a trip out of state or you might find a relevant collection at a historical society or public library nearby. Primary Source Databases Your library may subscribe to a database that hosts digitized primary sources, like historical newspapers. Search through your library databases or see if any are listed in your class LibGuide/Research Guide.

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