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Tutor profile: Spring L.

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Spring L.
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Questions

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

I'm looking for resources for a paper I'm writing. Can you find free, online scholarly papers that discuss the connection between Ivan Pavlov and anxiety disorders?

Inactive
Spring L.
Answer:

Sure, I'm happy to help! Here's a few free online articles I retrieved about the connection between Pavlov, fear conditioning and anxiety: https://europepmc.org/articles/pmc4156287 https://www.psychiatry.wisc.edu/courses/Nitschke/seminar/Garakani%20A,%20Mt%20Sinai%20J%20Med%2073,%202006.pdf http://www.philipcorr.net/uploads/downloads/29.pdf Let me know if you need any additional resources!

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

I'm reading The Great Gatsby in school. My teacher wants me to write a paper about symbolism in the book, but I don't even understand how to get started. Can you help me?

Inactive
Spring L.
Answer:

Absolutely! Let's start with the basics. Symbolism is a fancy word that just means using one thing to represent another. For example, hearts often symbolizes or represents love. Authors often symbolism in their books, but it's not always as easy as figuring out that hearts = love. There's a lot of symbolism in The Great Gatsby, and some of it is more obvious to figure. Let's start with an easy one. Multiple cars are described in The Great Gatsby, and most of them are very expensive, so what do you think cars might represent (or symbolize)? Money! Cars are used by many characters to show off their wealth, their vanity, and their status in society. Similarly, when the drunk driver causes an accident, he is showing how little he (and other rich people) care about their possessions. He can easily afford another car because he is so wealthy, so he doesn't care very much about destroying it. That car crash shows the carelessness of people who are rich; they're ignorant of the cost and work that went into creating that car, in the first place. Now that I've given you a few examples, why don't you give it a try! Can you think of any symbols you've come across in The Great Gatsby?

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

I don't understand the difference between whoever and whomever. How do I know when to use each one?

Inactive
Spring L.
Answer:

Deciding when to use whoever versus whomever can be so confusing! Basically, whoever is a SUBJECT pronoun and whomever is an OBJECT pronoun. For example: "Whoever is available can help that student" versus "The student went to whomever was available for help." If you're still having trouble remembering the difference, try to replace whoever/whomever with a different pronoun. Whoever = he, she or they; whomever = him, her, or them. For example: "He is available to help that student" versus "The student went to her for help."

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