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Tutor profile: Gabrielle D.

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Gabrielle D.
Ivy League Graduate Offers SAT, English, Writing, and Philosophy
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

Hello tutor, Can you please tell me whether the following thesis statement is effective? I have attached: "Through use of syntax, diction, and extended metaphor, William Shakespeare portrays lead characters Romeo and Juliet as embodiments of the transition from immature love, to mature love."

Inactive
Gabrielle D.
Answer:

Thank you for your question! In response to your attachment, this is a fantastic claim! As you may have learned, claims are arguable, complex, specific, and define the scope of your paper. First, You have certainly presented an arguable statement. You present an idea that your reader may not initially agree with. Second, your approach is complex. You detail three varied technical elements that contribute to the overall meaning of the play, as you see it. You describe a philosophical arc that is implicit in Shakespeare's work with character. Third, you have kept your claim specific. You have clearly defined the terms you are working with (syntax, diction, and metaphor). You have clearly defined what overall meaning these elements contribute to (the meaning of love in the play). Finally, your thesis statement gives a very good impression of what you will discuss in your paper. I assume you will spend paragraph 1 discussing syntax, paragraph 2 discussing diction, and paragraph 3 discussing metaphor. Great work!

Subject: Philosophy

TutorMe
Question:

Compare, analyze and evaluate Diotima's view of the relationship between desire and knowledge with that proposed by Lacan (as expressed in the following quote: "Psychoanalysis reveals that knowledge is never simply knowledge but that desire always accompanies it, that desire always trumps knowledge when it comes to how we act. The unconscious is this desire from which knowledge can never extricate itself.” [McGowan, 17].)

Inactive
Gabrielle D.
Answer:

Diotima (and Socrates) suggest that love is the desire to have the good and the beautiful forever. Diotima claims that Love’s function is “giving birth in beauty both in body and in mind.” In her view, all people, men and women, are pregnant and seek to reproduce so that they may achieve immortality. The process of “giving birth,” physically or metaphorically (as we will see), is divine, and therefore beautiful. Thus, the object of love is always this act reproduction. We reproduce ourselves by having children (physical birth), but also when we grow in wisdom and transmit our ideas to others. Thus, desire, whose object is always immortality and reproduction, is the source of knowledge. It is, in a sense, the engine that drives our search for knowledge, and the transmission of it (education, for example). Compare with Lacan, who says that “desire,” “always accompanies” knowledge. Lacan and Diotima appear to be in agreement. However, Lacan tends to use psychoanalytic terms, i.e. “the unconscious,” in comparison with Diotima’s use of the Greek, eros. (Different context, different terminology)

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

Hi tutor, I would like help answering the following prompt: "Conduct a character analysis of Natasha Rostova from Dostoevsky's War and Peace."

Inactive
Gabrielle D.
Answer:

Hello, Thank you for your question. I am happy to help. In the novel War and Peace, Natasha Rostova represents the joyful embrace of life. She lives freely and spontaneously. She is, in many way, a foil for the cold and imperious Helene Kuragina. Unlike Helene, who is presented as calculating, Natasha is never depicted as a show-off--she inspires desire simply by being her own unique self. One of Natasha's weaknesses is her naivety. She mistakes a momentary desire for Anatole Kuragina and, in so doing, betrays her betrothed, Andrew Bolkonski. Throughout the novel, Natasha Rostova undergoes a transformation, in which she learns the value of piety and forgiveness. Her spiritual development is so profound, that by the end of the novel she has become the equal of the novel's male protagonist, Pierre Bezhukov. Natasha Rostova's transformation reflects Tolstoy's philosophical views on life's meaning: the author privileges spiritual achievement (God, forgiveness, love) over material achievement (social status).

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