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Tutor profile: Jessica E.

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Jessica E.
Tutor with 8 Years Experience! Patient, Detail Oriented, & Kind.
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

"Can you help me structure my body paragraph?"

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Jessica E.
Answer:

"For sure! Have you heard of the 'PEA' Model? It stands for Point, Evidence, Analysis. This means the best way to structure your paragraph is to have a strong topic sentence to start. This will give the reader a hint of what your paragraph will be about. The make a 'point', this is your first argument that contributes to your overall thesis statement. Then use evidence to back up your point, such as a quote or research. Finally, explain why the evidence relates to your point and why it is important. Do this two to three times in a paragraph and you've got a strong start!"

Subject: English as a Second Language

TutorMe
Question:

"What is the imperative mood and how do I use it in a sentence?"

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Jessica E.
Answer:

"Hey there, the imperative mood is used when you are "commanding" or "demanding" a certain task or request. It is the kind of voice/phrases one would see a "boss" or someone in command use. Examples are: 1. Get this done now. 2. Out of my sight! (although this is not nice!) 3. Please listen to me. "

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

An example of an advance English Comprehension and Analysis Question I've addressed is: "In "Orientalism", Ch1, Page# 40, Said states that “In Cromer's and Balfour's language the Oriental is depicted as something one judges (as in a court of law), something one studies and depicts (as in a curriculum), something one disciplines (as in a school or prison), something one illustrates (as in a zoological manual). The point is that in each of these cases the Oriental is contained and represented by dominating frameworks. Where do these come from?”. Analyze the passage and answer the following question using the other two reading of the week as well: Where do these dominating frameworks come from?"

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Jessica E.
Answer:

My sample response is below: "The dominating frameworks that characterize the “Orient” as the subject of control are ones arising from three core factors. The first of these, is the theoretical and practical displacement of the “Orient” (The East) around the “Occident” (The West). The East being characterized as Asia and the Middle East in the context of this reading. The West, representing Europe and to a lesser extent the US, within Said’s analysis. In its essence, this feature focuses on how the dominant frameworks create the “other”. The second, are the roles ontology and epistemology have in narration building and the implication these pose in the discourses of International Relations. This is the second key factor contributing to the origination of these frameworks. Ontology and epistemology come to form a perspective, one in which can passively be utilized as an observer or actively engaged with the role of researcher. In turn, it substantially impacts the way in which knowledge is created when in regard to the “Orient”. As a result, this factor functions in establishment of frameworks that not only demarcate, such as in the first factor, but characterize who the “Orient” and the “West” are. The third, is Orientalism’s nascent conceptual parochialisms that work to treat knowledge from the non-core (The “Orient” with the inclusion of Latin America and Africa) as non-scientific and inherently less valuable as a consequence. Subsequently, limiting their capacity to function in the role of knowledge creators of their own narratives. This third factor functions to reinforce the outlined euro-western ontologies and epistemologies as objective; in turn, these colonial frameworks are allowed to become hegemonic due the invisibility they are granted as a result of their normalization. These three traits come together to create, characterize, and reinforce where the conceptualization of the “Orient” comes from. However, having noted the significance of these three factors, they culminative impact are twofold. This paper will pivot to discuss the implications that this form of knowledge production and ownership play in regard to the theories of “cultural strength” and “positionality”. “Cultural strength”, introduced by Said in this course, is defined as consisting of two parts. The first is the growing accumulation of knowledge about the Orient from the West –manifested in areas of the developing sciences such as ethnology, comparative anatomy, alongside literature by individuals by individuals such as travellers or novelist. This is followed by an unequal power distributions of the “Oriental-European” relations that placed Europe in a position of strength and the Oriental in the weaker position. Here, the Orient is identified by the West rather than themselves and often characterized in a puerile manner, such as immature, irrational, and inept. “Positionality”, as discussed in Picq, is the idea of reorganizing the spatial arrangement of IR discourses in order to combat the centrality of the euro-western framework. This is achieved through the understanding of the historical cultural differences of amongst national identities and the political implications this poses. To compound this, the decentering of “core” in order to produce a more neutral and accurate framework than what existed prior. These two implications are noted due to them functioning as oppositional responses to the existing hegemony of the West and its dominances over the Orient’s narrative. This first being due to the people producing the research, whom are from outside the west reclaiming a portion of their narrative back. Secondly, the assertion “positionality” brings forwards tackles the core issue of Orientalism and that is the production and ownership of knowledge. Positionality calls for the combatting and dismantling on this."

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