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Tutor profile: David O.

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David O.
Reference and Instruction Librarian with 8 1/2 years of experience
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What are logos, ethos, and pathos in terms of how they are applied to argumentative, or persuasive, writing?

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David O.
Answer:

(As Casca said in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, “It’s Greek to me” (1.2 line 284).) It is always important to be conscious of these terms as a writer of arguments. To be conscious of these terms, I believe, can make anyone an even stronger arguer. Basically, to break down this "it's greek to me" language of logos, ethos, and pathos, we are dealing with creating a well thought out structure – knowing what information to use to back up your thesis and figuring out where it is going to fit the best in your paper (the logos part watered down without getting in depth with Toulmin and supporting unstated assumptions). We are also, through the language, words, type of evidence, and amount of evidence we use, making our readers trust us and feel we are intelligent (the ethos part). And, finally, any way we can grab readers' attentions, especially audiences who might not be greatly interested in our issue, whether through a thought provoking opening line or title, narrative, or descriptive, vivid language, will help move readers to listen to our view (the pathos part). It is also interesting to see how each of these can overlap as well; having a strong logos can add to your credibility as a writer (your ethos). Once you have built up a decent level of ethos in your writing, readers will also be able to buy into your pathos. For instance, readers may see that your not just using pathetic appeals to trick them into considering your point, but they will tend to trust the places you do use pathos (because you’ve built up their trust through ethos) and see, even more so, how those places of pathos are appropriate to your argument.

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

In the Romantic writer William Wordworth's poem, I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud, what does Wordsworth mean by a world that is half seen and half created and how does this lead to his state of happiness?

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David O.
Answer:

“I Wandered Lonely As a Cloud” strongly deals with the power of the mind to construct a scene of beauty while away from the scene, thus demonstrating human creativity that leads to happiness. In this poem the scene is “A host of golden daffodils” (line 4). The speaker went “wandering” and all of sudden came across a field of beautiful daffodils whose “sprightly dance . . . Out-did the sparkling waves in glee” and made him feel exuberantly happy (lines 1, 12, 14). At this moment, he points out that while “gazing” at the scene he didn’t think much about “What wealth the show to me had brought” (lines 17-18). While he’s mesmerized by them, he is not thinking about the exact treasure they could bring him. The treasure or “wealth” he is talking about is when he’s away from them in a lonely room and in a state of feeling empty or slightly depressed there is this immense power of the mind to create or imagine the dancing, gleeful daffodils. Because his mind has the power to create this scene he is restored to a state of sublime and “jocund” feelings, which he calls “the bliss of solitude” (lines 16, 22). A scholar on Wordsworth, David Joplin, points out that “The final stanza emphasizes much the same experience, only this time it occurs through memory–the poet lies on his couch and recalls the ‘host,’ which then triggers the mind’s reaction. The daffodils, therefore, affect the poet directly and indirectly through his eyes and his mind” (2). The poem definitely talks about the power of the mind to imagine a scene of beauty and create it in “the inward eye” and thus produce extreme beauty and happiness in the exact place or state of mind where extreme beauty and happiness were lacking (line 21). The power comes, too, with how the mind interprets the daffodils; the mind sees how beautiful they are and knows the “pleasure filled” effect of their beauty (line 23). Therefore, the golden flowers aren’t just mirrored back, but the mind is creating them because the mind interprets them as beautiful – paralleling one of Wordsworth’s most profound insights of what the mind half sees and half creates. This blend of physical and mental visioning is the creative power that the speaker has, which starts to lessen the degree of stress in his immediate surroundings and begin his path to a state of happiness. Joplin, David. “Wordsworth’s ‘I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud.’ ” EBSCOhost. Academic Search Elite <www.sbu.edu/friedsam.html>.

Subject: Databases

TutorMe
Question:

Where can I find literature reviews about the Named Social Worker profession in the UK?

Inactive
David O.
Answer:

If you just google or do a web search of "google scholar" and click the google scholar link, you're brought into google scholar(GS). In GS, there is a search box and I would suggest typing into the search box "Named Social worker" to start. The scholar side of google is different from doing a google search. If you see a "full text" link or pdf to the right of your article title in google scholar, that means you can get the full text of the article. Google Scholar is a project that has digitized journal literature. Now, there could be strict guidelines from a professor whom might want a class to only use library subscription databases, but many times if I can't get a full text from a library database, I plug that article title into google scholar to see if it's in GS. On your library's website, I clicked on the subject pages link and followed through to Social Sciences-->Sociology-->Find Articles-->then there's that British Journal of Sociology listed under the journals heading, since you're looking at UK. You can also search your topic in the Journal Locator search box to find other journals that would house articles on Named Social Work. Does this help you out more?

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