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Kyle L.
Bachelors Degree in Literature and English Language, Pursuing Masters in Library and Information Science
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Writing
TutorMe
Question:

Decide whether the following writing prompt is best answered in an expository, descriptive, persuasive, or narrative style of writing. After choosing a writing style, create a few sentences that respond to the prompt and use the appropriate writing style. Should texting while driving be illegal in every state?

Kyle L.
Answer:

The writing prompt provided is most appropriately answered in a persuasive writing style. Texting while driving has been proven to be as, if not more, dangerous than drunk driving. And it is hard to find a rational argument for why drunk driving should be legal, Ultimately while an individual is putting them self in harms way by driving under the influence, the true injustice of such a decision is the possible threat that drunk driving brings to the safety of others on the road. The same logic stands for texting and driving. While individuals may decide that the convenience of texting and driving is worth the danger to their own life, they do not have the right to jeopardize the well being of those sharing the road with them. In this way, just as drunk driving or reckless endangerment are illegal across the nation so too should texting while driving.

Literature
TutorMe
Question:

In F. Scott Fitzgerald's short story "Babylon Revisited" what is one way in which the author uses symbolism to gesture at a certain theme or idea?

Kyle L.
Answer:

one of Fitzgerald’s hallmarks is his use of symbolism. Peter Hays notes that beginning with This Side of Paradise Fitzgerald, “... was learning a new technique not only by experimenting with a central symbol, but also by his focusing on a few incidents for economy and by replacing ‘smart’ writing with some sharp, concise imagery” (3). In this way, the title of “Babylon Revisited” in and of itself draws symbolic comparison between the setting of the piece and the ancient Mesopotamian city. For the audience to whom Fitzgerald is writing bible scripture is most likely very well known. Biblically the city of Babylon is quite important. Throughout the course of the bible the city is used as a representation of a people focused on amassing worldly material possessions, rather than moral or scrupulous wealth. In fact, by Revelations Babylon is used in comparison to the Antichrist’s new world system. As such, in the bible God multiple times uses Babylon as an example of the discipline he will evoke to those who stray from his word. Such a reference leads the audience to assume from the very beginning of the work that the setting of the piece and its inhabitants are lacking in moral fiber. But what is the setting that Fitzgerald is referring to, is it Paris, or rather a particle venue in the city? Certainly the city of Paris and the nation of France are representative of a secular city and nation. And in many ways I believe that this plays a role in the symbolic importance of the setting, purposely placing the characters in such a place is a key signifier that in some regard God (moral fiber) is already dead. Nonetheless, I posit that there is a more specific setting in the piece that is key to developing the symbolic connection to Babylon, and therefore developing the allegorical criticism of society. In terms of places that are “revisited” in the narrative the Ritz Bar is the first to come to mind. The story opens and ends in this setting, in this way of course it is revisited. But the audience also finds out through the course of the story that in his past Charlie has spent more than his fair share of time soaking up all of the libations offered by the Ritz, meaning that Charlie’s introduction to the piece is also him revisiting Babylon, so to speak. As well as the motif of returning to the Ritz (Babylon), the name of the bar would have likely had a significant meaning to the audience that Fitzgerald was writing to. As is described in Eduardo Pagan’s PBS feature on 1930’s High Society: The Ritz was another favored venue for extravagant celebrations. It hosted two of High Society’s most memorable coming out parties during the Great Depression. Socialite and “poor little rich girl” Barbara Hutton, grand-daughter of the dime-store magnate Frank W. Woolworth, made her debut there in 1933. Costing more than $60,000 ($1million today) it was one of the most glamorous parties of the 1930s. Eucalyptus and silver birch trees were imported from California, four orchestras played accompanied by singer, Rudy Vallee. It was attended by a veritable Who’s Who list of the rich and famous, including the Astors and the Rockefellers (1). Fitzgerald’s choice in naming the chief location of the piece after a such a well known hangout of the highest of high society would seem anything but a mistake. This tethering to the real world Ritz, coupled with the preexisting reference of Babylon leads to the bar in the narrative becoming a concrete symbol of not only Babylon, but also of the current American socio economic ruin. In this way Fitzgerald narrows his sights on a specific target for his criticism. By putting the ancient city of Babylon in conversation with both the real world Ritz and the narrative Ritz, Fitzgerald portrays that not only is he dissatisfied with the actions of the wealthy socialites of the time, but that moreover his most paramount concern is the moral duty of these high class members of society to their country and fellow citizens.

English
TutorMe
Question:

In the following sentence please list the grammatical change necessary, and why it is necessary. I grew up with cleats, a baseball glove, and a baseball bat waiting by the back door, uniform hanging in the closet; Sports Illustrated posters covering the refrigerator; baseball cards sitting on the kitchen table.

Kyle L.
Answer:

The comma after "door" must be replaced with a semicolon. The semicolon after the word door is appropriate because semicolons are used between items in a series when one or more of these items include commas.

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