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Tutor profile: Kaci H.

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Kaci H.
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

Rewrite the sentences bellow using a pronoun and a transition: Sheila participated in several activities at summer camp, like canoeing. Sheila made crafts, learned how to build a fire, and went hiking.

Inactive
Kaci H.
Answer:

A pronoun is a non-specific way to refer to a specific noun previously mentioned. This is helpful to avoid sounding repetitive. Rather than using "Shelia" again in the second sentence, we will rewrite this sentence using "She." A transition is a way to show that time has passed or to connect ideas. Rather than jumping into a list of the activities Shelia did at summer camp, we will use the transition "In addition." Shelia participated in several activities at summer camp. In addition to canoeing, she made crafts, learned how to build a fire, and went hiking. Pronouns and transitions help writing flow naturally and avoid sounding choppy or repetitive.

Subject: Basic Math

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Question:

Use the associative property of multiplication to solve 56 x 4.

Inactive
Kaci H.
Answer:

The associative property is basically rearranging the numbers you are multiplying into more manageable numbers (or known facts). This can also be helpful in multiplying large numbers mentally. If I know that 50 x 4 is 200, and 6 x 4 is 24, then I know that 56 x 4 = 224. I can also think of this as (50 + 4) x 4 = 224 and (50 x 4) + (6 x 4) = 224.

Subject: Education

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Question:

What is the workshop model of instruction?

Inactive
Kaci H.
Answer:

The workshop model of instruction includes a mini-lesson, independent practice time, and a debriefing. Each workshop session should start with a mini-lesson lasting 10-15 minutes. The four components of a mini-lesson include a connection, teaching point, active engagement, and a link. Embedded in these four components is the gradual release model of instruction. - Connection: This is where a teacher invites students to get their brain ready for what they are about to learn. This may be a question of inquiry they discuss with a partner, a story or analogy that connects to the lesson, a recap of past learning, or even a warm-up problem. - Teaching Point: This is where the learning goal is clearly defined. (ex. I can use the distributive property to solve a multiplication problem.) The teacher may also solve or show an example of the work students are about to do. ("I Do" part of gradual release model of instruction) - Active Engagement: The students will now participate in the learning. (This usually includes the "We Do" part of gradual release where the students and teacher work together) - Link: This is where students are sent off to practice or work towards the lessons goal. (This may include an informal assessment before send off to make sure students are understanding the material) The next part of the workshop model is the independent practice time for students lasting 20-45 minutes. While students are working, the teacher should be meeting with students in small groups or conferencing with students about their learning based on their individual needs. Last, the workshop model of instruction ends with a debriefing lasting 5-7 minutes. A debriefing may include sharing student work with partners or the class, an exit ticket or quick check assessment, or a shared reflection of their learning.

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