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Tutor profile: Kelsey Y.

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Kelsey Y.
Teaching Artist specializing in arts education
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Questions

Subject: Shakespeare

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Question:

How can I relate to Shakespeare's plays?

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Kelsey Y.
Answer:

While they were written over 400 years ago, Shakespeare's plays are still popular because of the themes they discuss and how millions of people have been able to relate to them. Family issues and sibling rivalry: (King Lear, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Taming of the Shrew...) a lot of Shakespeare's plays show tension in families and how the main characters relate. Parents often do not understand the issues their children are struggling with while the children often rebel against the parents. There are many fights between siblings in relation to opposing view and choices they make. Feminism and Gender Roles: (Twelfth Night, Taming of the Shrew, As You Like It...) Shakespeare began writing strong female roles to please Queen Elizabeth I. A lot of these women held positions of power, questioned their roles in society, and were strong, smart, and complex. Love: (Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, Much Ado About Nothing...) Oftentimes, love in Shakespeare's plays start off unrequited- someone likes a person but they do not like them back. Or, there is a serious reason why two people can be together. Whether the play is dramatic or comedic, people in the play overcome obstacles in order to be together. Politics and Power: (Julius Caesar, King Lear, Richard III, Othello, Hamlet, Macbeth...) A lot of Shakespeare's plays discuss politics and the ways people reach these positions. Topics include corruption, influence, jealousy, manipulation, and more. Not only do these plays share the view of the leader in charge, but also those who rebel against this power.

Subject: Literature

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Question:

What are the main types of antagonists?

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Kelsey Y.
Answer:

An antagonist is someone or something that gets in the way of the protagonist. A protagonist always wants something and the antagonist is the obstacle the protagonist has to overcome. Four of the main types of antagonists include: Evil- someone who is bad, and has no other layers other than doing harm. This tends to be a story of good vs. evil. Example: Harry Potter's evil antagonist in Lord Voldemort. He wants to destroy Harry Potter and take over the wizarding world for his own needs. Opposing- someone who isn't necessarily bad, but has an opposing view to the protagonist. Example: In "Les Miserables" the antagonist is Javert, a police inspector who wishes to uphold the law. While he is not inherently evil, he is considered the antagonist because he wishes to put the protagonist in jail. Superior- someone or something that naturally has a higher position of power and dominates over the protagonist. This can include nature, government, religion, society... Example: In "The Crucible", government, society, and religion are the antagonists against John Proctor. Because of fears that they do not understand, everyone in Salem starts a witch hunt and begins to blame everyone around them. Internal- the inner conflict of the protagonist. Opposing desires or needs that go against what the protagonist wants. Example: In "Macbeth" the title character is the protagonist who wanted to be king. But, in order to succeed, he had to kill his successor. Now, he struggles with the guilt of what he has done and fights with his inner thoughts and choices. This leads to his madness seeing ghosts of those he has killed.

Subject: Film and Theater

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Question:

What is one strategy to explore and analyze a character in a script?

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Kelsey Y.
Answer:

There are many strategies to go about exploring a character, but one of the most important ways is to identify their objectives. After reading the script, you need to figure out the character's objectives, or what they want most. Identify their superobjective: what they want most in the world/script (example: I want to get this job and make a lot of money) and their objectives: what they want in that moment or scene (I want to finish writing my resume). This way, you can explore their intentions, actions, desires, and how they treat others around them. Every interesting character has an objective. Once you figure it out, you can explore further why they do what they do.

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