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Tutor profile: Alexander N.

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Alexander N.
5 years tutoring experience
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

My teacher told me I have trouble with run-ons.

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Alexander N.
Answer:

Ok. Let's take a look at one of your sentences so we can use it as an example. If we can come to a better understanding of how a sentence operates on a structural level, then you can use this revised sentence as a template to correct any other run-ons in your paper. You're good at math, right? So let's think of it as an equation. Every sentence must have two things: a subject and a verb. For example, "I am", is a sentence because it contains the subject "I" and the vern "am.". I can usually identify run-ons in my own work by first identifying my subject and verb. The subject is the object or noun and the verb is what that subject or noun is doing. Make sense? Ok. So for your sentence: "Iago is evil because he doesn't have any morality in his dealings with Othello that makes them both hate each other." Iago is our first subject and is is the action. The next subject is actually Othello and he "makes" them both hate each other. I would recommend breaking this sentence into two sentences by using a period: "Iago is evil because he doesn't have any morals. Iago's lack of morality invites nothing but hate from Othello." I'm personally a fan of short and simple sentences because if you think about it writing is meant to convey information as effectively as possible. Sometimes I find myself trying to construct these long, complex sentences because I want to sound "academic," but in reality, most professors prefer to read papers that are short and succinct rather than drawn out and convoluted.

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

I'm really having trouble understanding any sort of "deeper" meaning, let alone the language Shakespeare is using. Sometimes I just have trouble following along.

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Alexander N.
Answer:

Well, our college actually has resources for that. I can show you where to find them. Whenever I read Shakespeare, I also listen to him, as it was written to be performed. There is a site here which has an archive of all his plays performed live. You can listen while you read along.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

I think I have a better grasp of the structure of a paragraph after our last session. What about transitions? How do those work?

Inactive
Alexander N.
Answer:

Let me show you. What I do to create effective transitions between paragraphs is to rewrite the last sentence of one paragraph and the beginning of the next. With these two sentences as a reference, I then do my best to come up with a sentence that links the two ideas. I then insert that sentence at the end of the paragraph in question.

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