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Barbara R.
Tutor of primary, secondary, and undergraduate students of a variety of linguistic backgrounds since 2006
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German
TutorMe
Question:

What is the central discussion of Wolfgang Borchert's theatrical work "Draußen vor der Tür"?

Barbara R.
Answer:

The theatrical work "Draußen vor der Tür" provides a social critique of the experiences and treatment of soldiers returning from WWII. This is chiefly depicted through the journey of Bachmann as he moves from house to house in his home village seeking a place to reinsert himself into his community. Sadly, as each doorstep conversation passes, it becomes increasingly obvious that the home Bachmann left behind before the war no longer exists and the Bachmann who has returned from the front is no longer desired as a member of the community.

International Studies
TutorMe
Question:

Discuss Nicholas D. Kristof's claim that “The central challenge in the poorest countries is not that sweatshops exploit too many people, but that they don’t exploit enough‟ with regards to the clothing industry and sweatshops.

Barbara R.
Answer:

In a 2009 Op-ed article to the New York Times, foreign correspondent Nikolas Kristof argued that, while endeavoring to ban sweatshops was admirable, it was also a seriously misguided approach to raising labor standards in developing countries. Drawing on his experiences in Phnom Penh, where scavenging through toxic landfills without protective gear is the reality of those who cannot find work elsewhere, Kristoff argues that concern should be not on the existence of sweatshops, but on the alternative to sweatshops, when they are not, or no longer, an option for someone. Though perhaps somewhat simplistic in its approach, Kristoff does raise an important point which is often lost in the gut-wrenching reaction that accompanies hearing about the use of sweatshops or child labor for manufacturing in developing countries: sweatshops are not the lowest, or worst, job option. International law through such treaties as the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights and the 1951 Equal Remuneration Convention of the International Labor Organization seeks to provide a legal framework with which to regulate labor standards across the world. However, the problem appears to be less one of a lack of rules, but rather one of application and enforcement. Traditionally, enforcement typically included a reprimand of the state or factory in violation of international obligations accompanied by an immediate retraction of association between the factory or state and the brand contracting them. This approach, however, was found to do more harm than good, as the removal of these modes of employment forced workers and their families into even more dangerous modes of employment. As a response, there has been a concerted effort in recent years to provide a viable alternative to the blanket banning of sweatshops. Frameworks such as the United Nations Guiding Principles, the Global Compact, and the emergence of Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives like the Fair Labor Association have sprung up, offering a hybrid approach of state and business regulation mixed with capacity building systems to encourage the creation of contexts allowing for the implementation of and adherence to these international labor standards and human rights laws. Though showing some success, it is important to note that these new approaches are also flawed. While helping to avoid forcing workers out of the proverbial frying pan (the sweatshop) and into the fire (prostitution, scavenging, etc) raising labor standards and enforcing human rights only helps those working in regulated industries, companies, etc. In some industries the supply chain can extend beyond regulated factories and into private homes and black market factories; neither of which may be known to the company contracting the work or to those enforcing regulations. Also, current international labor regulations place these responsibilities squarely on the shoulders of the factories, who have argued they are under great pressure from buyers to implement these costly regulations, but buyers are not willing to pay an increased cost.

English as a Second Language
TutorMe
Question:

Where are the two placements of adjectives in a common English sentence?

Barbara R.
Answer:

Adjectives are typically found either accompanying a noun or with a linking verb such as 'be', 'seem' or 'become'. When accompanying a noun the adjective will most often be placed in front of the noun it is modifying. In the case of linking verbs, the adjective should be placed after the conjugated verb.

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