Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Samantha B.

Inactive
Samantha B.
Copyeditor working at state legislature. Tutor for 10 years
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

How should I begin to edit my paper once it is finished?

Inactive
Samantha B.
Answer:

Editing is what you begin doing as soon as you finish your first draft. You reread your draft to see, for example, whether the paper is well-organized, the transitions between paragraphs are smooth, and your evidence really backs up your argument. You can edit on several levels: 1. Content Have you done everything the assignment requires? Are the claims you make accurate? If it is required to do so, does your paper make an argument? Is the argument complete? Are all of your claims consistent? Have you supported each point with adequate evidence? Is all of the information in your paper relevant to the assignment and/or your overall writing goal? 2. Overall structure Does your paper have an appropriate introduction and conclusion? Is your thesis clearly stated in your introduction? Is it clear how each paragraph in the body of your paper is related to your thesis? Are the paragraphs arranged in a logical sequence? Have you made clear transitions between paragraphs? 3. Structure within paragraphs Does each paragraph have a clear topic sentence? Does each paragraph stick to one main idea? Are there any extraneous or missing sentences in any of your paragraphs? 4. Clarity Have you defined any important terms that might be unclear to your reader? Is the meaning of each sentence clear? Is it clear what each pronoun (he, she, it, they, which, who, this, etc.) refers to? Have you chosen the proper words to express your ideas? Avoid using words you find in the thesaurus that aren’t part of your normal vocabulary; you may misuse them. 5. Style Have you used an appropriate tone (formal, informal, persuasive, etc.)? Is your use of gendered language (masculine and feminine pronouns like “he” or “she,” words like “fireman” that contain “man,” and words that some people incorrectly assume apply to only one gender—for example, some people assume “nurse” must refer to a woman) appropriate? Have you varied the length and structure of your sentences? Do you tends to use the passive voice too often? Does your writing contain a lot of unnecessary phrases like “there is,” “there are,” “due to the fact that,” etc.? Do you repeat a strong word (for example, a vivid main verb) unnecessarily? 6. Citations Have you appropriately cited quotes, paraphrases, and ideas you got from sources? Are your citations in the correct format? As you edit at all of these levels, you will usually make significant revisions to the content and wording of your paper. Keep an eye out for patterns of error; knowing what kinds of problems you tend to have will be helpful, especially if you are editing a large document like a thesis or dissertation. Once you have identified a pattern, you can develop techniques for spotting and correcting future instances of that pattern. For example, if you notice that you often discuss several distinct topics in each paragraph, you can go through your paper and underline the key words in each paragraph, then break the paragraphs up so that each one focuses on just one main idea.

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

Describe an example or religious allegory in William Golding's 𝘓𝘰𝘳𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘴.

Inactive
Samantha B.
Answer:

In the novel the 𝘓𝘰𝘳𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘴, by William Golding, strong parallels have been drawn between Simon and Jesus Christ. In the novel, Simon is described as a Christ-like figure. Although William Golding does not directly connect the Christian symbolism to 𝘓𝘰𝘳𝘥 𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘍𝘭𝘪𝘦𝘴, we can clearly see that Simon is indeed the resemblance of Jesus Christ for he is a wise, mature, and insightful character just as Christ is known as, being sacrificed as a consequence of discovering the truth regarding the beast, and also, his conversation with the Lord of the Flies corresponds to Jesus Christ’s confrontation with the devil during Jesus’ forty days in the wilderness, as told in the Christian Gospels.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is a thesis?

Inactive
Samantha B.
Answer:

In academic writing, an thesis is usually a main idea, often called a “claim” or an “argument,” backed up with evidence that supports the idea. In the majority of academic papers, you will need to make some sort of claim and use evidence to support it, and your ability to do this well will separate your papers from those of students who see assignments as mere accumulations of fact and detail. Theses can be as simple as “Protons are positively charged and electrons are negatively charged,” with evidence such as, “In this experiment, protons and electrons acted in such and such a way.” Claims can also be as complex as “The end of the South African system of apartheid was inevitable,” using reasoning and evidence such as, “Every successful revolution in the modern era has come about after the government in power has given and then removed small concessions to the uprising group.” In either case, the rest of your paper will detail the reasoning and evidence that have led you to believe that your position is best. When beginning to write a paper, it's best to ask yourself, “What is my point?” If your paper doesn't have a main point, you cannot be arguing for anything. Asking yourself what your point is can help you avoid a mere “information dump.” Consider this: your teacher probably knows a lot more than you do about your subject matter. Why, then, would you want to provide them with material they already know? Teachers are usually looking for two things: 1. Proof that you understand the material 2. A demonstration of your ability to use or apply the material in ways that go beyond what you have read or heard. This second part can be done in many ways: you can critique the material, apply it to something else, or even just explain it in a different way. In order to succeed at this second step, though, you must have a particular point to argue. Arguments in academic writing are usually complex and take time to develop. Your argument will need to be more than a simple or obvious statement such as “Frank Lloyd Wright was a great architect.” Such a statement might capture your initial impressions of Wright as you have studied him in class; however, you need to look deeper and express specifically what caused that “greatness.” Your instructor will probably expect something more complicated, such as “Frank Lloyd Wright’s architecture combines elements of European modernism, Asian aesthetic form, and locally found materials to create a unique new style,” or “There are many strong similarities between Wright’s building designs and those of his mother, which suggests that he may have borrowed some of her ideas.” To develop your argument, you would then define your terms and prove your claim with evidence from Wright’s drawings and buildings and those of the other architects you mentioned.

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Samantha will reply soon.
Contact Samantha

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.