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Tutor profile: Lily L.

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Lily L.
Doctoral Student
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

Let's say you are asked to write a cover letter for a graduate school application. How would you structure your letter, and what sort of information would you like to to include?

Inactive
Lily L.
Answer:

When writing a cover letter for a graduate school application, I would begin by introducing myself and illustrating how I became interested in my field of study. I would briefly discuss my experience in the field, making note of any important projects I was involved in. I would then write about what my experience has taught me and how it has helped me grow as an individual and as a professional. I would then write about why I am interested in this particular program. I would discuss how the program's specific characteristics fit in with my personal and career goals. I would demonstrate how the program would be a good fit for me, and how I would be a good fit for the program. I would sign off the letter with a gracious thank you, and provide my contact information. I would keep the letter short, one page maximum.

Subject: Psychology

TutorMe
Question:

Trauma can affect people in many ways, even years after the event took place. Early childhood is a particularly vulnerable time, and so adverse experiences in early childhood can have deep and lasting effects. If a child were to experience a trauma (such as a divorce, an accident, or a death), how do you think it might affect them later in life, and what sorts of care or treatment do you think might help them?

Inactive
Lily L.
Answer:

If a child experiences a trauma in their early life, it could affect them cognitively, emotionally, and socially. Depending on the nature of the trauma, it might make them avoidant of people or situations that remind them of the trauma (for example, someone who witnessed a car crash might become fearful of driving, and avoid cars or people who were involved in the crash). Trauma in early childhood can cause anxiety (both generalized and specific phobias), and a sense of isolation and self-blame that can lead to depression. These symptoms can follow a person through their adulthood. Again, depending on the nature of the trauma, the individual might also experience dysfunctional relationships. They may have difficulty trusting people, or be fearful of emotional vulnerability. They may have difficulty talking about the trauma, which could hinder intimacy in close relationships. While it is difficult think and talk about traumatic events, it may be helpful for the individual to process the experience with a trusted friend or family member. In this way, the individual could gain clarity about what happened, feel a sense of relief, and feel less isolated. They may also benefit from psychotherapy. Cognitive-behavioral therapy might help the person by teaching them practical coping skills and helping them become less fearful of things associated with the event. Psychodynamic therapy might help the person explore their experiences and emotions surrounding the event, creating insight and providing relief. The individual may also benefit from psychiatric medication, which can help lower anxious and depressive symptoms.

Subject: Early Childhood Education

TutorMe
Question:

Young children need support in so many ways, however they also need to be given space to experiment and try things on their own so that they can gain a deeper understanding of how the world works. How might you, as an early childhood educator, help a child who is struggling to tie her shoes while empowering her to solve the problem herself?

Inactive
Lily L.
Answer:

I would assist the child by offering support, without taking over the task completely. For example, I would not simply tie her shoe for her. Instead, I might sit beside her and show her how to tie laces on my own shoe. I would find ways to break down the task into smaller steps, and perhaps demonstrate a song or a poem that could guide her through the steps. In this way, the child could learn by following my example. I would encourage her to try tying her own shoes, allowing her to figure out for herself what does and does not work. If she were to become frustrated, I would validate her feelings, provide comfort, and encouraging her to keep trying. By helping the child with the task in this way, I would help her develop a sense of mastery over the task that she could take pride in.

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