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Tutor profile: Laura B.

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Laura B.
Library Manager
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

How do I know if I've written a good essay?

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Laura B.
Answer:

The first thing you want to do is make sure you've read all of your teacher's instructions and have followed them. Did they specify a page count or word count? If yes, then make sure you've at least met that- some teachers will be ok with it if you're at least really close to the number, but you don't know if you have one of those teachers until you've gotten your paper back! Next, read your essay out loud to yourself. Does it make sense? Are you talking about one thing in one paragraph, and then leading into another area in the next, or are you mixing it all up all over the place? Do you have a thesis statement that tells exactly what your paper is about, and if you do, does your paper actually follow that statement? Your teacher wants to read your idea, and if you start talking about something that's not really relevant, it's going to drag your paper down.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

Thomas Dewey is not exactly as revered as he was once in library circles. What are the benefits to continuing to use the Dewey Decimal System as opposed to Library of Congress classification?

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Laura B.
Answer:

One benefit to Dewey is a social benefit. Most of us who went to libraries growing up are familiar with Dewey. LoC is primarily used in academic libraries. It is important to learn how to use it if you will be working in academia for a long period of time, but the issue with LoC over Dewey is that generally, you can find a book in the same place in 5 different libraries from 5 sections of the United States using DDS. LoC will give you a record of what is in THAT library, but if you need to travel and find that book again, the classification will be different. Subjects are more complicated in LoC. There are nuances, of course, due to Cuttering, which we can talk more about!

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

Why did Jane freak out and faint in the red room in Jane Eyre?

Inactive
Laura B.
Answer:

The color red itself actually may have played a part in her fainting fit. Look up the physical effects of red on the human body, some of those effects could lead to a child fainting. On top of actual physical effects from the color, she was in pain, scared, and alone. Read up on causes of fainting and you can see there are very practical reasons for her to faint, not necessarily a ghost!

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