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Morgan C.
Music Student-Performance and Education
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Writing
TutorMe
Question:

How do you create flow throughout a piece of writing?

Morgan C.
Answer:

Writing flow refers to the smoothness with which one moves between sentences and ideas. The easiest way to check for flow in your writing is to read it out loud. Any abrupt endings or run-on areas will become more apparent. As for the writing process, flow can be created in a number of ways. Varying sentence structure will help with ease of reading. Try using a mixture of simple, complex, and compound sentence structures. I personally prefer using short, concise sentences when trying to emphasize a particular point. The transition between ideas is also vital for creating flow. Again, reading the writing out loud will help you identify any ideas that seem to be disconnected to each other. First, consider rearranging the order of your ideas if you believe that will create a more logical progression. Writing one or two sentences that explain the relationship between two or more ideas can also be helpful in creating a clearer, more meaningful transition.

Music Theory
TutorMe
Question:

How do musical periods work, and what are their labels?

Morgan C.
Answer:

A musical period consists of two phrases, each ending with a cadence. In classical music, these phrases are typically 4 measures each, but can vary greatly depending on the piece. Period labels consist of a melodic and harmonic label, in that order. For a melodic label, you have two options. The first is parallel, meaning the melody of the two phrases is almost exactly the same. There can be some slight variations, especially towards the end of the phrase, but they are overall very similar. The other option is contrasting, where the two phrases show little to no copying or melodic similarity. As for the harmonic label, there are four choices. Harmonic labels are based on the phrases' cadences and any modulation that may occur within them. The first is sectional, where the first phrase ends in an IAC (imperfect authentic cadence), continues in the tonic key (i.e. doesn't modulate), and ends with a PAC (perfect authentic cadence). The second option is the interrupted period. Here, the first phrase ends in a HC (half cadence), continues in the tonic key, and ends on a PAC. The third label is continuous. In a continuous period, the first phrase ends in an HC or AC in a key other than the tonic. So, there is a modulation in the first phrase. The second phrase will continue in that new key, then modulate back to the tonic and end on a PAC. The last harmonic label is progressive. The first phrase ends in an HC or IAC in the tonic kay. The second phrase then modulates to a new key, and ends in an AC in that new key.

Music
TutorMe
Question:

What are the two primary parts of a time signature?

Morgan C.
Answer:

A time signature consists of two numbers stacked vertically. The top number represents the number of beats in a measure, while the bottom number represents which note value gets the beat. The top number can be virtually any value, usually ranging from 1 to 12. Some measures only have 2 beats, while others can have 5 or 8 or any number in between. The bottom number is always a multiple of 2, with the except of 1. As previously stated, that number represents which note value gets a beat. 1 is a whole note, 2 is a half note, 4 is a quarter note, 8 is an eighth note, and so on.

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