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Tutor profile: Madeline H.

Inactive
Madeline H.
Biology Major and National Merit Scholar
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Questions

Subject: PSAT

TutorMe
Question:

Why is the PSAT even important? My parents want me to study and practice for it, but I just don't see the benefit. The ACT will be what I send to colleges, not the PSAT.

Inactive
Madeline H.
Answer:

Actually, the PSAT is a super beneficial test! At the bare minimum, it will give you great practice for that ACT or SAT you will be taking soon. A main key to success on all standardized tests is learning how to work efficiently under a time limit: the PSAT will help you learn how to do that. In addition to the awesome practice for the ACT or SAT, you will have the potential to receive scholarship money! Through my high score on the PSAT, I was eligible to compete in the National Merit Scholarship Program, through which I ultimately won a scholarship! So, let's get started practicing and preparing you for the PSAT: I promise it will be worth it.

Subject: Biology

TutorMe
Question:

I have a test over the mechanisms of evolution next week, but I am really struggling to memorize them! What is a trick that will help me retain them?

Inactive
Madeline H.
Answer:

I use the 5-finger strategy to memorize the mechanisms of evolution. The five mechanisms are natural selection, gene flow, mutation, non-random mating, and genetic drift. Natural selection is the "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" that nature gives a set of traits, leading to an increased or decreased chance of survival. Think of natural selection as your thumb in the 5-finger strategy. Gene flow is the immigration or emigration of a population, leading to a mixing of traits with a different population. An example would be a flock of geese flying north and mating with a different population of geese they come across. Because gene flow points in a particular direction, either caused by a population entering or leaving, it is represented by your pointer finger. Mutation is a genetic change. Because mutation starts with an "m," think of your "m"-iddle finger as representing it. Non-random mating is the idea that individuals pick mates based on a set of traits they find the most attractive. Humans practice non-random mating. Think of your ring finger as being representative of non-random mating as it relates to partnership. Genetic drift is caused by a small population size. Your pinky finger is your smallest finger, so it will represent genetic drift.

Subject: ACT

TutorMe
Question:

I want to score as highly as possible on the ACT to maximize scholarship and college admissions potential. How can I study/practice to earn a high score?

Inactive
Madeline H.
Answer:

The ACT is just as much about testing strategy as it is content knowledge. Of course, you must have a strong foundation in the subjects on the test, but practice working under the time constraints and building strategies for success is just as important. A good first step is to take the test "cold' without timing yourself. This way, you can go through the exam and locate any area in which your content knowledge is lacking. After reviewing any subjects that may be weaknesses, the next step is to practice, practice, practice under the time limits. Sometimes, students struggle to complete sections in the limited amount of time available, so it is important to address those sections and devise strategies to finish the test on time. For example, a tip for the science portion of the test is to avoid reading all of the given text and graphs: it is a waste of the limited time allotted. Instead, read the questions first and only use the given information as a tool to locate the necessary answers. Ultimately, by practicing and identifying strategies for success, it is possible for all students to excel on the ACT.

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