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Tutor profile: Sabrina S.

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Sabrina S.
Graduate Writing Student
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

I've been given a prompt to write a argumentative essay on the pros and cons of wearing sunscreen, and I must choose a side. I must include four sources. Where do I begin?

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Sabrina S.
Answer:

Before I even begin writing, I always start with an outline! An outline can be as detailed or plain as you'd like it to be, but for papers that require research, I like mine to be specific. This will help keep you on track while you're writing. Let's do an example here. Introduction (unless directed otherwise, begin your essay with a introduction): - Opening sentence (Begin with a strong first sentence, something that entices your reader to keep reading. This sentence does not have to be hefty with information, but should clearly give a topic. Of course, setting the scene of the paper may take a few sentences, but ultimately you want to keep the introduction on the shorter side) - Thesis statement (The last paragraph of your intro should be your thesis statement, which is a sentence that describes your argument. For this prompt, you could say something along the lines of "There is scientific data that shows us the pros and cons of sunscreen, but, ultimately, it is crucial to wear sunscreen in order to protect your skin." You may also do something more simple such as "For this essay, I will be arguing for the use of sunscreen to help prevent sunburn and skin cancer." A thesis statement should be specific, yet broad enough that the rest of your paper can touch on an array of topics) First Body Paragraph: - Begin with a topic sentence (The topic sentence is similar to a thesis statement, but in this case, it only applies to this individual paragraph and can therefore be more specific. You may say "There is scientific evidence that shows there are cons to wearing sunscreen." Make sure that this paragraph is about this statement only) - Discuss the cons of wearing sunscreen - Include two resources and detail why they are relevant (Once you find these resources, I recommend including them in your outline and giving a summary or bullet notes on how you will incorporate them into your paper. You can also include specific quotes and page numbers here–the more detailed your outline is, the better prepared you will be to write your essay. Not to mention it's much easier having quotes ready to use when you're in the groove of writing!) Second Body Paragraph: - Begin with a topic sentence - Discuss the pros of wearing sunscreen - Include two resources and detail why they are relevant Third Body Paragraph: - Begin with a topic sentence (Since this is an argumentative essay, this is the paragraph in which you will be arguing for the use of sunscreen and detailing why the cons are not applicable) - Include further quotes/data from the research collected to strengthen argument for sunscreen - Argue against the cons by, again, supporting your statements with facts Conclusion: - A brief summary on the key points argued - Emphasize your argument

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

Grammar question: What is the difference between "their," "there," and "they're," and how do I remember when to use the proper form?

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Sabrina S.
Answer:

Their is the possessive of they and is used when something belongs to someone. For example, you may say "This is their house," "place their flowers on the counter," or "their train is running late." A way I remember is by looking at the "I" in "their"–"I" is a pronoun, which helps me remember that "their" is a possessive pronoun. There is used to describe a place–you may say "My house is over there," "place the flowers there," or "I'll be there soon." A simple way to remember this form is there = place. They're is a contraction of "they are." For example, you may say "They're living in that house," "they're beautiful flowers," or "they're running late." Sometimes it's best to think out the contraction–"they are beautiful flowers" can be shortened by using "they're."

Subject: Art History

TutorMe
Question:

How was conceptual art different from previous art movements? Use the essay "Death of the Author" by Roland Barthes to assist in your answer.

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Sabrina S.
Answer:

In “Death of the Author,” Roland Barthes raises some interesting points that relate to the movement that is Conceptual art. Barthes suggests that the removal of the author “transforms the modern text,” and is “thought to nourish the book, which is to say that he exists before it, thinks, suffers, lives for it, is in the same relation of antecedence to his work as a father to his child,” (145). Additionally, Barthes says “the reader is the space on which all of the quotations that make up a writing are inscribed without any of them being lost; a text’s unity lies not in its origin but in its destination,” (148). I believe that Barthes is arguing the removal of the author allows the reader to become more intertwined with the work that the author has produced instead of attaching it to a source (the author). This all relates to Conceptual art through the ways in which artists attempted to remove their skills and the labor by which they created their pieces so that the viewer would focus on the product and derive the meaning of the piece from what was displayed in front of them opposed to the artist’s craft. To display writing or a work of art without a source implies that anything can be art, and the ways in which it is meant to be interpreted and/or understood is left up to the reader or viewer.

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