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Tutor profile: Renee S.

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Renee S.
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

The traditional cinquain is typically described as a five-line poem with a syllabic pattern of 2-4-6-8-2 by line. Here is an example by Adelaide Crapsey: "Listen. . With faint dry sound, Like steps of passing ghosts, The leaves, frost-crisp'd, break from the trees And fall." Try writing your own cinquain below.

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Renee S.
Answer:

Summer Its humid clutches sweltering, boiling hot draw lines of sweat across my cheeks- drip, drip.

Subject: Gender Studies

TutorMe
Question:

Consider the ways in which women are socialized, even unconsciously, to perform for men - through dress and appearance, behavior, and so on - as though they exist in a panopticon. Describe what a panopticon is, and go on to list some real-life examples of how women adapt to that constant surveillance.

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Renee S.
Answer:

The panopticon was a disciplinary method proposed theoretically to keep prisoners in line. The way it worked was that all prison cells would be arranged in a circular fashion around a central tower, from which guards could see into any cell at any time. Thus, prisoners would never know when they were or were not being watched, and adapted to this by ingraining obedience into even their unconscious behaviors. In this same fashion, women may perform for others using tools such as makeup, clothes that are deliberately designed to make the wearer look more slim, and products for their hair or face that are purported to reduce the effects of aging. In addition, adapting to this constant surveillance may cause women to monitor others in the same way, denigrating them on weight or body hair or any number of mannerisms, whether to increase their own social standing with men or to give them a fleeting sense of power in this surveyed state.

Subject: English

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Question:

“I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself. I will keep the law given by God; sanctioned by man. I will hold to the principles received by me when I was sane, and not mad—as I am now. Laws and principles are not for the times when there is no temptation. . . . They have a worth—so I have always believed; and if I cannot believe it now, it is because I am insane—quite insane: with my veins running fire, and my heart beating faster than I can count its throbs.” - Jane Eyre, Chapter 27 Provide a 2-3 paragraph analysis of this quote, discussing in particular Jane's view of her personal principles and their function.

Inactive
Renee S.
Answer:

This quote provides insight into Jane’s view of the law, or at least which laws she holds herself to. Even if she is a free spirit, she still makes a point to follow the laws given by God and sanctioned by man, because she believes that that is the right thing to do. Jane’s religious slant shines through here somewhat unexpectedly: in a time of turmoil, she still thinks about her Christian principles, and refuses to give them up no matter how emotionally compromised she is at Rochester’s betrayal. These laws of God that she describes are not defined here, but she still emphasizes that they are best relied upon during times when one is tempted to break them. These are what she personally assigns value to, and what she ultimately deems more valuable than Rochester’s love in this part of the story. The focus on the concept of sanity in this quote is an insightful one, too, as some variation of the word “sane” is used multiple times. Part of the reason Jane is so adamant about holding herself to her personal principles is because, as she says here, she received them while she was “sane.” In other words, she was in her right mind then, so it wouldn’t do her any good to break those principles and sacrifice her respect for herself while she’s not in her right mind. The word “temptation” here reinforces that she is still in love with Rochester, and that his presence has a pull on her that is a threatening force, one that might sway someone with less conviction than Jane has. Even so, Jane claims that she is “mad” here—mad in the sense that she’s lost her mind, even though she clearly retains enough sense to see that Rochester’s behavior is unacceptable, and it would be a greater loss for her to stay with him than it would be to leave.

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