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Tutor profile: Maddy P.

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Maddy P.
Creative Writing and Music Double Major in Undergrad
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

My teacher gave me the writing prompt: "write a paragraph describing your favorite food in detail", and all I could do was: "I like Mac and Cheese. It is yellow and I use pasta shells." How do I elaborate on this and make it interesting?

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Maddy P.
Answer:

I would start by writing about why you love mac and cheese, just get your fingers typing or your pencil moving. Start with something normal (i.e. it tastes good) and try to make the statement as outlandish as possible (i.e. Without mac and cheese the world may have fallen apart before I even reached Tuesday for it was the only sustenance that my tongue could bare to taste). After sometime, move on to trying to make some metaphors. (i.e. it is yellow can turn into the yellow cheese was the sun on a plate.) or (i.e. the pasta shells came from the depths of the ocean, they must have, how else would everyone of them been so delicious and shaped and chipped like the invasive zebra muscles on the shores of lake Michigan). And soon you will find you have the ability to string your sentences together to form a most interesting paragraph: To say I like mac and cheese is an understatement. You see, some people simply say it tastes good, with its yellow cheese and pasta shells, but I say more. I say without mac and cheese the world may have fallen apart before I even reached Tuesday for it was the only sustenance that my tongue could bare to taste. And the taste is only half of it, the way it looks, oh I could write sonatas about the way it looks. It is yellow can turn into the yellow cheese was the sun on a plate.) or (i.e. the pasta shells came from the depths of the ocean, they must have, how else would everyone of them been so delicious and shaped and chipped like the invasive zebra muscles on the shores of lake Michigan. So yes, you could say I like mac and cheese... but I, I would say so much more.

Subject: Music Theory

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between a major 7th chord and a minor 7th chord?

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Maddy P.
Answer:

Let's say we are making a D major 7th chord and a d minor 7th chord: The seventh chord is made up of 4 notes, the root (D), the third, the fifth, and the seventh notes in that scale. So the D major chord uses the D major scale, where as the d minor chord uses the minor scale. D Major: D, E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D D Major 7 chord: D, F#, A, C# d minor: D, E, F, G, A, Bb, C, D d minor 7 chord: D, F, A, C So the difference is in the 3rd and the 7 on the scale which are placed in the chord. F# vs F and C# vs C. However, sometimes the chords are based on scales you don't know well, or on notes like Dx (D double sharp), which technically doesn't have a scale. In this case it is good to understand the construction of the scale on a half note level, so you could build a chord even if you didn't know it's scale: The construction of a major 7th chord is a major 3rd (or 4 half steps), a minor 3rd (or 3 half steps), and a major 3rd (or 4 half steps) stacked on top of each other. (feel free to use a keyboard to visualize half steps). So a D major 7th chord would start with D, and we would count 4 half steps up from D (D to D#, D# to E, E to F, and F to F#) making the second note in the chord F#. From F# we would count 3 half steps from F# (F# to G, G to G#, G# to A) making the third note in the chord an A. From A we would count 4 half steps from A (A to A#, A# to B, B to C, and C to C#) making the fourth note C#. Where as the construction of a minor 7 chord is a minor 3rd (or 3 half steps), a major 3rd (4 half steps), and a minor 3rd (or 3 half steps), stacked on top of each other. (notice it is the exact inverse of the major, feel free to use a keyboard to visualize). So a d minor 7th chord would start with D and we would count 3 half steps up from D (D to D#, D# to E, and E to F) making the second note in the chord F. From F we would count up 4 half steps, (F to F#, F# to G, G to G#, and G# to A) making the third note A. From A we would count 3 half steps up (A to A#, A# to B, and B to C) making the fourth note C.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is a prepositional phrase, and why do I need to use it?

Inactive
Maddy P.
Answer:

Essentially a prepositional phrase is used to provide more information for the reader about the noun. Imagine asking the question, "which onion should I use?" and getting the response "an onion." While this is technically an answer it provides no information and would end up with you picking whatever onion you want. Where as a prepositional phrase could add "the onion ON THE COUNTER." Which tells you not to use the onions in the fridge. It is a prepositional phrase because it starts with the preposition ON and ends with the noun COUNTER which is also not the main subject (onion) of the previous statement.

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