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Tutor profile: Dorfam F.

Inactive
Dorfam F.
English Tutoring since 2011, current TESL student
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

Structure: Structure is something many students struggle with when writing, especially for writing formal papers, such as a thesis paper. What is the best way to provide feedback for structure?

Inactive
Dorfam F.
Answer:

I personally like to provide feedback on two different levels: overall structure and paragraph structure, and I do so using the most common method: PEEL. PEEL stands for: P -> Point - Make your point ( this is with reference to your opening statement where you make your point. Be as clear and precise as possible.) E -> Explanation - this is when you provide further explanation and clarification with relation to the point you're trying to make. E -> Evidence - this is where you list your examples and refer to your sources. Your evidence should support your point and your explanation. and should not go off tanget. L -> Link - this is the part where you link your point to your overall argument. It is also where you can link one paragraph to the next. There should be a transition here. You can't just jump from one topic to another. I apply PEEL to each paragraph and then to the overall structure of a paper. This visualizes for the students whether or not all of the paragraphs link to their thesis statement, and if not, how and what they can change to accommodate their point. It helps keep students on point and prevent them from going off tangent, which is a common pattern in papers that deal with broader topics. This is also an issue when a student has too many sources under "Evidence" and while trying to explane their point, they end up going off tangent. PEEL method helps reduce these occurances.

Subject: English as a Second Language

TutorMe
Question:

What is the best approach for error correction?

Inactive
Dorfam F.
Answer:

Error correction is very dependent on the context and the task. It's best to be flexible when it comes to approaches to error correction as different approaches might work better than others depending on the classroom context and task being done. For example, in a conversation practicum, I don't like to point out every error a student has made. Instead, I make notes and try to see if there is a trend. For example, a student might have difficulty keeping up with different tenses. If I were to point out every error in our conversation, that would be too demotivating and discourages the student. Instead, I allow the student to speak and share feedback in a positive manner at the end, providing insight as to why I think they made error, how they can recognize different patterns and how to improve. Error correction is also in part the responsibility of the students. After a lesson has been taught, they should spend time at home working on the feedback they've received. It's important for teachers to correct errors when they see or hear them. If we don't let students know, they won't notice the errors themselves and might have difficulty communicating outside of the classroom. However, it isn't enough to merely point out the errors. We need to provide constructive feedback that will be helpful not just for the task at hand, but also for future tasks. For example, if I'm assisting a student with their writing, it is not enough to just highlight the error. I need to explain why it is an error, what the correct form is and how they can avoid making the error in the future.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between whom and who? Is it who or is it whom?

Inactive
Dorfam F.
Answer:

"Who" is an interrogative pronoun and is used in place of the subject. "Whom" is also an interrogative pronoun but instead, it is used in place of the object of a verb or preposition. An easy method to help determine whether you need to use who or whom is to replace it the word with he/she and him/her. If you can replace it with he/she, you should use "Who" and if you can replace it with him/her, you should instead use "Whom". i.e. To whom were the flowers addressed to? The flowers were addressed to her.

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