Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Kari S.

Inactive
Kari S.
English Major with Background in Academic Writing and Theatre
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

How do you write an MLA style in-text citation for print sources?

Inactive
Kari S.
Answer:

When writing an essay in MLA format, you should include an in-text citation any time you directly quote or paraphrase a source. The citation will be enclosed in a set of parentheses at the end of the sentence, with the period placed outside of the parentheses. The citation itself provides a signal word or phrase followed by a page number. If you provide the signal word/phrase in the sentence, you do not need to include it in the parenthetical citation. Usually the signal word/phrase is the author's last name, but if that is unknown or unavailable, you can use an abbreviated version of the title. Examples: 1. Wordsworth stated that Romantic poetry was marked by a "spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings" (263). 2. Romantic poetry is characterized by the "spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings" (Wordsworth 263). 3. Wordsworth extensively explored the role of emotion in the creative process (263). As you can see, Example 1 uses a direct quote and states in the sentence that Wordsworth is the source. Therefore, the citation only lists the page number. In Example 2, a direct quote is used, but the sentence does not mention where the quote is from, so the citation lists the author followed by the page number. Please note the citation must always be done in that order, with the author name first and the page number second. In Example 3, there is no direct quote, but it is a paraphrased statement that was a specific reference to the source, so a page number must still be provided.

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

What is a literary example of dramatic irony?

Inactive
Kari S.
Answer:

Dramatic irony occurs when the reader, or audience, is aware of something that the characters are not. An example of this is from Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet." At the end of the play, Romeo finds Juliet lying unconscious in her family tomb. The audience is aware the Juliet has faked her own death by taking a potion where she appears to be lifeless, but the letter that explains this was never delivered to Romeo. Romeo assumes that she is truly dead and kills himself.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between a metaphor and a simile?

Inactive
Kari S.
Answer:

Metaphors and similes are both literary devices and can be difficult to differentiate since they are both a form of comparison. A metaphor is a figure of speech that describes an object, idea, or action by referencing something else that is not literally applicable. For example: "This old phone is a piece of garbage." This is a metaphor because the phone is not literally a piece of trash, but the comparison references how the phone is worthless and needs to be thrown way. If you're wondering whether something is a metaphor, an easy way to check is to ask yourself whether the comparison is literally true. A simile directly compares two different things by highlighting the similarities. For example: "She was as sweet as honey." Or "She was sweet like honey." Or "She was sweeter than honey." This is a simile because the comparison shows how two separate things (the girl and the honey) are alike because they share a similar trait (both are sweet). The best way to recognize a simile is to see if the comparison uses the word "like," "as," or "than."

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Kari will reply soon.
Contact Kari

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.
BEST IN CLASS SINCE 2015
TutorMe homepage
Made in California by Zovio
© 2020 TutorMe, LLC
High Contrast Mode
On
Off