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Tutor profile: Cj K.

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Cj K.
Three years as professional tutor in Psychology, Criminal Justice, and Math.
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Questions

Subject: Basic Math

TutorMe
Question:

I'm currently in a math class for non-STEM majors in college, we have a lot of diverse topics in my class such as taxes, logical fallacies, savings accounts, loans (mortgages, student loans, car loans), credit cards, common scams, excel spreadsheets, Venn diagrams, and more. Can you help me learn all these topics?

Inactive
Cj K.
Answer:

Of course! I have been tutoring all types of lifestyle math for over three years, I would love to help you with any of those topics and more!

Subject: Psychology

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between declarative and nondeclarative memory?

Inactive
Cj K.
Answer:

Declarative memory is any memory you can verbalize. Declarative memory includes Semantic memory- facts you know, and Episodic memory- any event you remember. Since you can say out loud that George Washington was America's first president (semantic), and describe how you felt on your birthday last year (episodic), both of these would be a declarative memory. Nondeclarative memory is muscle memory. If you have played the piano for eight years you have a very good nondeclarative memory for piano keys and any music you have memorized. If you play football and don't have to actively think about catching a ball-that is also nondeclarative memory. As well as skills nondeclarative memory also encompasses daily things such as knowing how to use silverware, tying your shoes, stirring a pot, etc.

Subject: Criminal Justice

TutorMe
Question:

How does the Restorative Justice theory and Transformative Justice theory differ? They seem exactly the same.

Inactive
Cj K.
Answer:

You're not wrong, they are very similar and can be hard to differentiate. Instead of focusing on them as two separate theories, think of transformative justice as being restorative justice but with extra elements. Restorative Justice came first historically-Transformative Justice happened after we changed restorative justice enough to make it its own theory. Restorative Justice theory wants to heal the harm caused by a crime; so it is not focused on punishing criminals, but having them "make up" for their crimes through positive deeds. For example, having people do community service after petty crimes, making bullies apologize to their victims, court-mandated family therapy, victims making statements in court against their abusers, are all restorative justice tactics. Restorative justice also places focus on the victim, making them the center of the rehabilitation process. Transformative justice includes and adds to restorative justice. Transformative justice adds in structural and sociological understanding of our societys structures and norms to explain why and how crimes happen. It argures that crime is defined by the state and unfairly punishes certain populations (Black Americans, LGBTQ+, etc) over others. By recognizing these differences transformative justice theory pushes for reform in the criminal justice system and legal/political systems that will improve the quality of life and equality of all people. The point is to empower people and give them the tools to live lives that do not involve crime. There is also an emphasis on that many criminals are also victims of crime, and many victims have committed crimes. This point is no used to discredit the victims, but to show that a system wide change has to be implemented to lower crime.

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