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Tutor profile: Miriam T.

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Miriam T.
Writing Major with Multiple Years Experience Writing for Publications
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What is the best way to get someone engaged in your writing?

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Miriam T.
Answer:

One of the best ways to get someone engaged in your writing is to include "a hook" at the beginning of your piece. A hook is anything that excites the audience and makes them want to read on. Hooks are incredibly effective tools in any writer's arsenal, and when perfected, can make readers much more receptive to what you have to say. That said, there are of course some forms of writing that do not allow for a hook. These texts may require a thesis as the first sentence, or are solely informational, rather than analytical or even conversational.

Subject: Film and Theater

TutorMe
Question:

What are multi-camera situation comedies, and why were they especially popular leading up to the 2000s?

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Miriam T.
Answer:

A multi-camera situation comedies (often called a "multi-cam sitcom") is a half-hour comedy show filmed on just a few sets, likely in front of a live studio audience. Examples of this format would be shows like "Friends," "Seinfeld," and "I Love Lucy." These are each shows that primarily take place in two or three locations (in "Friends" this would be Monica's apartment, Chandler and Joey's apartment, and the coffee shop). The reason these shows were more popular is due to their relative cheapness and ease to make. A single-camera sitcom (i.e. "The Office," "30 Rock," and "Modern Family") has a large amount of locations, making it logistically much more difficult to film. However, as technology has improved, we have seen a decrease in the prominence of multi-cam sitcoms, and have transitioned more to the single-cam format.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is the correct situation to use "whom" rather than "who" in a sentence?

Inactive
Miriam T.
Answer:

In sentence structure, "whom" is used to refer to the object of the sentence, whereas "who" is used for the subject. An example of correct "whom" usage would be: "I wasn't sure whom to ask about that." Here, "I" is the subject, as they are the one who "wasn't sure." Meanwhile, "whom" is the object, as they are affected by the main action of the sentence, rather than performing said action. Correct "who" usage: "Who is saying that?" In this case, "who" is the subject, as they are the one doing the "saying." They are performing the action in the sentence, and therefore they are the subject.

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