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Angelina L.
Tutor for Primary School - Middle School
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Basic Math
TutorMe
Question:

Solve: 2x + 3 - 5(x+1) = 9

Angelina L.
Answer:

2x + 3 - 5(x+1) = 9 (Expand the brackets first following the rules of BODMAS) 2x + 3 - 5x + 5 = 9 (-5 from both sides) 2x + 3 - 5x +5 - 5 = 9 -5 2x + 3 - 5x = 4 (-3 from both sides) 2x + 3 - 5x - 3 = 4 - 3 2x - 5x = 1 -3x = 1 (divide both sides by -3) -3x / -3 = 1 / -3 x = -1/3

English as a Second Language
TutorMe
Question:

Compare Act 1 and 2 of King Lear, and express how and why Shakespeare creates a distinct difference between them.

Angelina L.
Answer:

Shakespeare’s use of contrast and parallel between Scene One and Two of Act One essentially explores the relationship between father and child, specifically, the aftermath of parental bias. Regan, Goneril, and Edmund - the children regarded as inferior to their siblings - all deceive their parents, whereas Cordelia and Edgar – the children prioritized by parents – stay true to their parent. Both Lear and Gloucester’s blindness to genuine love foreshadows Lear’s eventual insanity and Gloucester’s literal blinding. Thus, Shakespeare may be commenting on family’s tendency for favoritism, and the conflict it can create within a person like Edmund, or between family members such as Lear and Cordelia.

English
TutorMe
Question:

How does F. Scott Fitzgerald contrast clothing between Nick and Gatsby, and for what purpose may this comparison serve?

Angelina L.
Answer:

Fitzgerald uses the comparison between Gatsby’s clothing choices around Nick, a man of simple class, and his clothing choices around Daisy, a higher class woman, to suggest that Gatsby is compelled to project wealth and style around those of the upper classes. As a result Fitzgerald shows that Gatsby’s behaviour and personal presentation around Daisy are a façade used to maintain and uphold an image of the American Dream. The first association of clothing related to Jay Gatsby is ironically about the subtlety of it. In fact, at the beginning of the novel there are little to no references to clothing suggesting Gatsby likely wore simple unnoticeable attire, so much so, Nick as the narrator does not even realize that he is speaking to the famous ‘Mr. Gatsby’ but only “a man of about [his] age”. From this, we can sense that Gatsby’s dress style is unspecific and indistinct, paralleling with the anonymity of his guise. Since little is known about him, many, including Nick, must depend on misleading rumours about the man of mystery. Therefore, it is evident that around Nick, who is of a lower class to himself, Gatsby does not feel compelled to impress or disprove disreputable rumours, and thus has no need to wear noticeable or flashy clothing to distinguish himself from being anything more than “a man”. In contrast, upon the presence of Daisy, Gatsby dresses with an intention to impress by conveying opulence and sophistication, wearing “a white flannel suit, silver shirt, and gold coloured tie”. Through this very specific description, it is apparent that Gatsby has taken great care in selecting his outfit to be significant and noticeable. His outfit is made up of the colours white, Daisy’s signature colour, and gold and silver which are exemplary of the American currency and therefore wealth. Gatsby’s careful consideration of colour in this incidence implies his need to impress Daisy, with the desire to enter her world where she embodies both the upper class and the American Dream. More specifically, his attention to detail suggests that Gatsby is very mindful of his presentation towards Daisy, perhaps due to an insecurity of his shameful past. Nevertheless, while Gatsby presents himself inexpensive clothing, the novel constantly implies that his suits are garish and vulgar, such as Tom’s exclamation that “he wears a pink suit!”. So although his suits display wealth, they also lack taste, suggesting that although he is trying to join Daisy’s world, he ultimately fails to do so convincingly. In this sense, Fitzgerald uses Gatsby’s choice of attire around Nick and Daisy to show his efforts to convey class and the American Dream around those of high status – an illusion that he does not feel compelled to express to those of lower class.

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