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Elizabeth C.
Biology Educator
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SAT II Biology E/M
TutorMe
Question:

A common carbohydrate of plant cells but NOT animal cells is (A) lactose (B) glycogen (C) glucose (D) cellulose (E) chitin

Elizabeth C.
Answer:

D is the correct answer. Glycogen is a complex molecule that animal cells use to store energy. Lactose is the sugar typically found in milk. Glucose is the primary means of energy consumption in both plant and animal cells. Chitin is the primary component of fungus cell walls and the exoskeletons of arthropods. Cellulose is the principal component of plant cell walls but is not found in animal cells.

SAT
TutorMe
Question:

Which sentence contains an error in it? A. When my windshield is washed, I can see through it more easily. B. Her bringing the pet boa constrictor to school caused a restlessness among her classmates and teachers. C. Irregardless of my exhaustion, I must proceed to the summit of the mountain. D. Well-placed punctuation confuses no one.

Elizabeth C.
Answer:

The correct answer is C. "Irregardless" is not a real word, but a commonly misused version of "regardless." "Irregardless" is a double negative word, as "ir-" and "-less" both negate the root word "regard."

Biology
TutorMe
Question:

The six commonly accepted biological kingdoms are Animalia, Plantae, Protista, Fungi, Eubacteria, and Archaebacteria. Compare and contrast the six kingdoms. What distinguishes each kingdom from the other kingdoms based on cell structure and energy requirements? Define any significant technical terms in your response.

Elizabeth C.
Answer:

All six kingdoms possess organisms--living things that obtain and use energy, reproduce, respond to their environments, have DNA, and are composed of cells. Archaebacteria and Eubacteria differ from the other 4 kingdoms based on cell type. These two kingdoms have prokaryotic cells, cells that do not have membrane-bound organelles and their DNA exists exposed in the cytoplasm of the cell. Kingdoms Animalia, Plantae, Protista, and Fungi are composed of eukaryotic cells which have distinct membrane-bound organelles and their DNA is contained in a nucleus with membrane surrounding it. Kingdom Animalia contains multicellular organisms that are heterotrophic, being composed of cells organized into distinctive tissues and organs and obtaining energy from organic food sources in their environment. Kingdom Plantae consists of multicellular photoautotrophs, organisms also composed of cells in distinct tissues and organs, but obtain energy from inorganic sources and transform it into organic material and usable energy. Kingdom Fungi contains mainly multicellular organisms, with a few unicellular kinds, that are heterotrophic decomposers. Fungi perform extracellular digestion on the material in which they are embedded. Kingdom Protista is composed primarily of unicellular organisms and some colonial organisms with some level of organization. The members of Kingdom Protista are heterotrophic and autotrophic and some species are both. Kingdom Eubacteria contains unicellular autotrophs and heterotrophs, but are prokaryotic cells; this kingdom has a widespread distribution and usually, each cell has characteristic cell wall structure. Kingdom Archaebacteria is also composed of unicellular prokaryotes that are autotrophic and heterotrophic, but these cells contain unique structures in their cell walls and are capable of living in extreme environments where nothing else can survive.

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