Subjects
PRICING
COURSES
SIGN IN
Start Free Trial
Aubrie L.
College Student; Nursing Major
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee
Shakespeare
TutorMe
Question:

How do you understand Shakespeare?

Aubrie L.
Answer:

The Language of Shakespeare is very hard to learn with just the book. I suggest finding an annotated copy of the work you would like to read. Even if you already have a copy at home or at school, if it is not properly annotated you should invest in another edition. Look for a copy that has detailed annotations at the bottom of each page or on the page opposite Shakespeare's text. When you find an edition that has annotations, skim over a passage at random and identify any words that you do not understand. If they are not all defined at the bottom of the page, put that edition back on the shelf. Often editors overlook words that might pose a problem to first-time Shakespeare readers. I find that even some of the most popular editions have this flaw, so don't be deceived by well-known names. If you are ordering by mail or online you do not have the luxury of glancing through the glossary. In this case, I would choose an edition from one of the following three series: The Falcon Shakespeare; The Kittredge Shakespeare; and The New Cambridge Shakespeare. The Falcon Shakespeare is the hardest to find, but it is by far the best for high school students.

English
TutorMe
Question:

How do I write a well thought out essay introduction?

Aubrie L.
Answer:

NEVER say "In this essay, i will talk about..." or "I will be talking about.." A good introduction MUST stand true to the following and must possess the following in the order: a good hook to bait the audience’ attention; background information and central idea around which the essay revolves. It must be purposeful and informative and cite the relevant information in an organized fashion. Without a good attention-grabbing device, your essay will not be able to capture the attention of the readers enough to give it a good look. An attention-grabbing strategy can be of various kinds; you can choose one depending on the purpose and intention of your essay. Some strategies include: starting the essay with a brief question, or the elaboration of facts or statistics, which is supposed to shock or jolt the reader; a personal story or experience; a memorable and relevant quote, definition of a key term; using a recent event to act as bait; presenting an opposite view to a commonly held belief once you have introduced a relevant and meaningful attention fact or sentence to provocate the reader into paying attention, you can delve into the second part of the introduction. This is the background. A good introduction needs to provide sufficient background on the topic and connect it to your starting statement. The background provides the context of the essay and is necessary for the audience to understand the reason why the essay was brought up. The background, thus, serves as a kind of connecting link between the topic and the body. The writer needs to use judgment to determine how much of background information should be provided; an overdose of information can prove counterproductive. What is central to an effective introduction is the core idea or the thesis. This is what links the whole content together. The idea has to be delineated clearly and it has to be emphasized throughout; else the essay will fail and will appear directionless. The writer has to also convince the audience about the importance of the thesis and why it is of relevance and use to them. The thesis statement should be around one to two sentences in length. There are different ways of writing the thesis statement. It can be direct and explicit in its details and leads the reader directly to the main points of the essay as well as it provides a definite shape, structure, and outline to the essay. The indirect thesis statement does not directly mention the points but rather provides sufficient indicators to the reader, as to what would be the subject of the essay. While there are many things which a writer can do to improve and enhance the introduction, some caution is required. While it is okay to add a little background, do not overdo it. Save the rest of the background for the succeeding paragraphs. Also, do not let the introduction run on and on; it is important for the introduction to be short and snappy; jazzy and effective. It can vary from a few lines to not more than half or quarter of a page. The rest of the information can be carried over into the remaining part of the body. Ensure that your introductions be as natural as possible—using your own words to convey your point, rather than saying what.

ACT
TutorMe
Question:

How do I manage my time better while taking the Act?

Aubrie L.
Answer:

While doing the Math section, go through all the questions and answer the ones you know with little to no work, then focus on the ones that will take a little more time and work. DO NOT spend time stuck on one problem. Skip over it and go back to it. Once the teacher calls 5 minutes begin to fill your remaining bubbles with anything because you will not be penalized for wrong answers. On the reading, partly do not read the passages first. Go to the questions and look for ones that say "in lines..." do all those first. once those are done you basically know what the passage is about and can just skim the passage and answer the rest. in Science you DO NOT need to read the experiment 99% of the time it is just graphs and charts so don't focus on all the words.

Send a message explaining your
needs and Aubrie will reply soon.
Contact Aubrie
Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Session
FAQs
What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Session" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.