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Tutor profile: Tilly D.

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Tilly D.
Native English ESL Teacher with 7 years of experience
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Questions

Subject: Spanish

TutorMe
Question:

When do you use Por vs Para in Spanish?

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Tilly D.
Answer:

Even though both Por and Para mean 'for', they can also take on responsibilities of other prepositions and phrases such as: by, on, through, because of, in exchange for, in order to. Por is used to talk about: 1. Travel and Communication - This can refer to mode of travel (car, train, etc.) or communication (email, phone, etc.) or even the route you take. e.g. La contacté por teléfono = I contacted her by phone. 2. Exchanges - Por is used to talk about exchanges and trades. e.g. Te doy 10 euros por la mochila = I'll give you 10 euros for the backpack. 3. Duration - Por is used to talk about the length of time an activity went on for. e.g. Dormí por 7 horas anoche = I slept for 7 hours last night. 4. Motivation - Por is used to talk about motivations or reasons for doing something. e.g. Por su amor a los animales, quiere ser veterinario = Because of his love for animals, he wants to be a vet. Para is used to talk about: 1. Destinations - Physical destinations, especially the endpoint of a trip. e.g. Salgo para Madrid mañana = I leave for Madrid tomorrow. 2. Recipients - Para is used to indicate the intended recipient of something, such as a gift. e.g. Este regalo es para mi madre = This gift is for my mother. 3. Deadlines - Para is used to talk about deadlines, including dates and times. e.g. Tengo que terminar esto para el viernes = I need to finish this by Friday. 4. Para is used to talk about goals and purposes. It's especially common to see para used with an infinitive to talk about why something is done. e.g. Hago ejercicio para mantenerme en forma = I exercise to stay in shape.

Subject: English as a Second Language

TutorMe
Question:

How do you use the passive voice in English?

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Tilly D.
Answer:

A sentence with the structure S V O (Subject - Verb - Object) can be made passive. To create passive sentences we take the object of a sentence and make it into the subject i.e place it at the beginning. e.g. Someone robbed the bank. - ACTIVE The bank was robbed (by someone). - PASSIVE Passive sentences are often used when the person doing the action is unknown or unimportant. In this case we usually leave off the subject. Sometimes we also use the passive voice to play more emphasis on the object. More examples of active and passive sentences: Someone has stolen my cheese / My cheese has been stolen. Shakespeare wrote Hamlet / Hamlet was written by Shakespeare. Everyone will love her / She will be loved by everyone.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between prose and verse?

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Tilly D.
Answer:

Prose refers to the language in its most basic form having no metrical structure. We use prose daily in speech, writing and thinking. A verse is used for metrical writing and uses a rhythmic structure. It is most commonly used in poetry and consists of creative and rhythmic language. A poem can have several verses.

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