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Tutor profile: Jayson P.

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Jayson P.
English Language, Literature, Physics and Philosophy
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Questions

Subject: Philosophy

TutorMe
Question:

Explain Kant's Moral (Categorical) Imperative.

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Jayson P.
Answer:

Kant's theory of morality is based on an essentially rationalist model--a beautiful work of philosophy expounded in his Critique of Pure Reason. His Categorical Imperative can be thought of as his final conclusion to the question, "How do we adjudicate a moral action from an immoral one?" There are several formulas Kant runs through in defining this conclusion, but perhaps the most famous is his "Formula for Humanity" which state that we should not treat anyone (ourselves included) as a means to an end, but rather as an end in themselves. There are many fascinating implications of this I won't dive into here.

Subject: English

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Question:

In Robert Frost's "Fire and Ice": Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice. From what I’ve tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire. But if it had to perish twice, I think I know enough of hate To say that for destruction ice Is also great And would suffice. What interpretations can you make for fire and ice vis a vis the end of the world?

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Jayson P.
Answer:

This poem uses fire and ice in two interesting ways, though the strictly literal one may or may not have been intentional. 1. Human Conflict--Fire and ice are presented here as aspects of human destructive potential. On one end "desire" and the other "hate". This makes sense in our conceptions of the words--a fiery temper versus a cold stare for example. 2. Literal--Fire and ice are two opposing ways of imagining the end of not just the world, but the whole universe in some theories of the end of the universe, most notably the Big Crunch (contraction and eventual explosion of the universe) versus the Big Freeze (continued expansion and heat death of the universe).

Subject: Physics

TutorMe
Question:

What is terminal velocity and how does it apply to someone skydiving?

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Jayson P.
Answer:

The world around us is a balancing act of forces and terminal velocity is a good example of how these forces work on a local level. Terminal velocity is the fastest speed an object will reach when released under gravity. Consider someone jumping out of a plane (hopefully with a parachute, as I have done once). As this person falls, what are the forces acting upon him? Well there are tons, but the ones on the macro level are the Gravitational Force: GF and the force of air resistance: AR. At some point these two forces balance each other out. When this happens, an object will reach its terminal velocity--that is to say the acceleration due to gravity will be completely counteracted by the drag brought about by air resistance, and thus the falling person will move no faster nor slower and their velocity (still quite fast) will not increase. NB - A parachute changes this equation by increasing the air resistance the person experiences, and thus changing their terminal velocity to hopefully something a little more gentle in landing. :)

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