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Tutor profile: Hannah G.

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Hannah G.
Grad Student
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Questions

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

What is an example of a metaphor, how is it used in literature and what is an effective use in your own writing?

Inactive
Hannah G.
Answer:

Metaphor is when you compare two unlike things, and generally does not use 'like' or 'as' in this comparison. Metaphor are used for literary effect and to elicit feeling within the reader. Metaphors have two components, the tenor is the thing the metaphor describes and the vehicle is the thing that the metaphor is compared to. Within literature, metaphors are often used and can be extended metaphors or quick metaphors. Using metaphors within your own writing can be tricky because it is best not to use overdone metaphors but also not overly obscure one's that will be hard to place and fully understand. An example might be the lake was a mirror, where the lake is not actually a mirror but it gives the same reaction and can create strong imagery for the reader.

Subject: Economics

TutorMe
Question:

What is an example of opportunity cost and how does this play a role in economic decisions

Inactive
Hannah G.
Answer:

Opportunity cost is the cost that you incur when you make a decision to do one thing rather than another. For example, say I am trying to decide between going to see a movie and studying for my big economics test in the morning. If I decide to study for my test and don't go to the movie, I incur a cost because I can't do what I wanted to do. Opportunity costs must be factored into a decision and they occur because individuals naturally have almost unlimited wants and a limited number of resources. Thus, an individual (and governments and companies) must be constantly balancing peoples wants with costs and needs.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

How do I work on changing my writing to include less passive voice? I have been told that passive voice can be confusing and hard to follow but I do not know how to find it and get rid of it within my own writing.

Inactive
Hannah G.
Answer:

Passive writing can be tricky to catch, but one way that I have found to be helpful is by including 'by zombies' after the verb. If by zombies can follow the verb and still make sense, then it is likely you are in passive voice. For example, in the sentence, 'The work was completed...by zombies' the addition of by zombies makes sense and shows that you are using passive voice to explain what happened. Passive voice occurs when the subject that is doing the action comes after the verb or is omitted altogether so it becomes confusing who or what is doing the action. In the above sentence, you could change it to 'The person completed the task' and the sentence is now in active voice. The little trick can effectively show when you are using passive voice and when you need to change it and eventually it will become second nature.

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