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Farah A.
Princeton Grad/Prospective law student
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Writing
TutorMe
Question:

I'm trying to write an essay about what I think this x school is a good fit for me but I'm just staring at a blank page. This x school is my dream school but I just don't know why it's particularly good for me.

Farah A.
Answer:

These "Why x college" essays can be quite daunting at first but you should really think of them as another opportunity to shine and tell them more about yourself. Unlike the personal statement, for these essays - you actually need to do some research and then it's just a matter of self-reflection like any other essay. Below are steps to move us closer to the writing process. 1. Do the research -Learn about the school via its website, blogs, etc. -Get in touch with people at the college about any questions you might have. For example, you might be interested in a particular department at the school, feel free to contact them for more information. -Talk to students at the school or alumni. -Visit the school if you can. 2. Reflect on what you know about the school. Now that you've done the research, reflect on what you've gathered. -What is about the school that attracts you the most? Is it the people, the professors, the location, academics..etc? -What makes this school unique from the other schools you're looking at? -What can you do or accomplish at this school that you can't do so at other schools? -What kind of people does this school attract? 3. Now imagine yourself at the school. -What kind of a student would you be at this school? -How would you take advantage of everything that you're attracted to at this school? -How would you contribute to the school? -What skills and experiences do you have that will enable you to succeed at this school? These are just some steps and questions that are a good start towards developing an essay. You can't write an essay like this without first pursing a deep reflection.

US History
TutorMe
Question:

How did the antebellum and postbellum migration of African Americans from the South differ from each other?

Farah A.
Answer:

First, let's make sure we know the difference between antebellum and postbellum. They're both period markers. Antebellum refers to the period before the war and postbellum refers to the period after the war. Often in US History, we use words such as antebellum and postbellum in the context of the Civil War. To understand the differences between African American migration from the South in antebellum and postbellum periods, let's start by identifying the differences between antebellum South and postbellum South. In antebellum South, slavery is a huge social and economic enterprise that dictates the lives of African Americans in the South. After the Civil War, slavery is abolished. So in postbellum South, African Americans are dealing with the legacy and after effects of Slavery. During the antebellum period, African American migration from the South was largely the migration of slaves trying to escape slavery by going to other parts of the United States that didn't practice slavery, such as some of the Northern states. The underground railroad is an example of such migration. In the postbellum period, African American migration from the South was the migration of free people who were looking for better social and economic opportunities in other parts of the United States. For example, a lot of African Americans from the South migrated to the Mid-west for jobs in the new industries that were opening in cities like Chicago. Key differences in the two migrations: -Who's migrating: f slaves vs. free people -Motivations: freedom vs. social/economic opportunities -Where people migrated: free states in the North vs. everywhere with economic opportunities (i.e Midwest and the West)

English as a Second Language
TutorMe
Question:

When is it appropriate to you "I've?"

Farah A.
Answer:

Good question. "I've" is a contraction. A contraction just makes the word shorter. So here, "I've" is a shorter version of "I have." Contractions are often used in everyday conversations. For example when talking to a friend about a book, instead of saying "I have already read that book," I would just say "I've already read that book." Notice how these two sentence have the same meaning but one is just shorter than the other. So meaning wise, "I've" and "I have" are the same. The use of "I've" depends on the context. If you're writing a formal email or essay, try not to use contractions like "I've." Instead, just write the actual word out. If you're citing dialogue in an essay and "I've" is in the dialogue, that's perfectly fine. To put it simply, it's appropriate to use "I've" in conversations and informal written exchange. Try to refrain from using "I've" in formal writing, such as essays or an important email you're sending to someone.

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