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Tutor profile: Devyn F.

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Devyn F.
Early Childhood Professional & Fan of Learning
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What are the different points of view a story can be told from?

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Devyn F.
Answer:

A story can be told from first, second, or third person point of view. The point of view is determined by who is narrating the story. If a story is told in the first person point of view, that means the narrator is in the story and speaking from their own perspective and will use words like "I," "me," and "mine." If a story is told in the second person point of view, that means the narrator is speaking directly to and about the reader and will use words like "you" and "your." Second person point of view is not very commonly used for stories and is more likely to be seen in directions and advertising. If a story is told in the third person point of view, that means the narrator is external to the story and speaking about it. They will use words like "he," "she," and "hers."

Subject: Early Childhood Education

TutorMe
Question:

A one year old bit another child! What should I do?

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Devyn F.
Answer:

First, immediately come to the aid of the child who was bitten. If the skin was broken, follow appropriate first aid procedures. Otherwise, get down on their level, comfort them, and offer a hug. Verbalize what happened and firmly restate classroom expectations, directed to the child who was hurt but in earshot of the child who bit and other children: "Jackson bit your arm! You are crying now, because biting hurts. Ouch! We do not bite our friends." Next, turn to the child who bit and repeat, calmly and firmly: "Biting hurts. Ouch! We do not bite our friends." Remove the child from the situation and give them a new activity away from other children. If they are upset, sit with them in a quiet area until they calm down. Do not yell, give punitive consequences, or shame them. Think about the situation and consult with other teachers to determine why the child may have bitten. If they are teething, consider offering them a teething toy each day to chew on. If they bit out of frustration, consider how you could adjust the classroom environment to reduce conflict. Follow your school or center's guidelines regarding accident report forms and when & how to communicate the incident to parents. Be sure to let both sets of parents know that biting at this age is developmentally normal and not an indicator of future behavior problems.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between an adverb and a preposition?

Inactive
Devyn F.
Answer:

An adverb describes a verb, while a preposition describes the relationship between a noun and something else. Adverbs can answer the questions "Where? When? How? How often? How much?" Many, but not all, adverbs are made by adding "ly" to the end of an adjective. For example: sadly, softly, frequently. They are usually placed next to verbs, for example: cries sadly, steps softly, runs frequently. Prepositions are words or small groups of words that go in between a noun or pronoun and another word. A preposition cannot usually stand on its own to answer a question. Many prepositions are directional words. For example: across, underneath, on top of. Sample sentence: "She [pronoun] sat [verb] attentively [adverb] in [preposition] school [noun]." In this sentence, the adverb "attentively" describes the verb "sat." The preposition "in" describes the relationship between the noun "school" and the action "sat attentively."

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