Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Philip L.

Inactive
Philip L.
Bachelor's in Finance, Current Budget Analyst for the State of California
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: Microsoft Excel

TutorMe
Question:

Calculate Average, Variance, and St. Dev. for WDC using Historical Data Analysis Make sure to use the full step by step calculation process for Variance You can use build in =average(…) function to find average ---- Calculate Average, Variance, and St. Dev. for WDC using Scenario Analysis Scenario Probability E ( R ) Average Variance Boom 0.1 22% 0.022 0.0021609 Growth 0.5 12% 0.06 0.0011045 Slow Down 0.3 2% 0.006 0.0008427 Recession 0.1 -15% -0.015 0.0049729 Average 7.30% Variance 0.00908100 STDev 9.53% ---- Use the following historical data to analyze 2-security portfolio. Create 'drop down' menu and use LOOKUP command so you can choose any 2 securities for the analysis. Construct Opportunity Set Table. Identify Optimal Risky Portfolio. Create Opportunity Set Graph with Opportunity Set, each one of the two securities labeled, and Capital Asset Line on it. -----

Inactive
Philip L.
Answer:

Date WDC Variance 1/1/2018 -2.18% 0.000941092 12/1/2017 12.58% 0.01366589 11/1/2017 0.85% 1.43244E-07 10/1/2017 -11.66% 0.015746991 9/1/2017 3.91% 0.000911969 8/1/2017 -2.12% 0.000903577 7/1/2017 3.70% 0.000791408 6/1/2017 -3.40% 0.001839863 5/1/2017 -1.62% 0.000629306 4/1/2017 1.11% 5.01851E-06 3/1/2017 8.60% 0.005945901 Average 0.89% Variance= 0.04138116 Standard Dev 20.34% ---- Scenario Probability E ( R ) Average Variance Boom 0.1 22% 0.022 0.0021609 Growth 0.5 12% 0.06 0.0011045 Slow Down 0.3 2% 0.006 0.0008427 Recession 0.1 -15% -0.015 0.0049729 Average 7.30% Variance 0.00908100 STDev 9.53% --- Column # 1 2 3 4 5 6 Returns Row # 'Drop Down' Menu Portfolio Opportunity Set Date WDC AAPL WFC VZ BIIB PG PCG CVX 1 Date AAPL WFC Sharpe Ratio W1 W2 R ( P ) Var (P) St. Dev. (P) 2/1/2018 -2.18% 6.38% -11.20% -10.70% -16.91% -8.36% -3.16% -10.71% 2 2/1/2018 6.38% -11.20% 0.4110 1.0 0.0 2.80% 0.0040799 6.39% 1/1/2018 12.58% -1.06% 8.42% 2.15% 9.18% -6.03% -5.35% 0.13% 3 1/1/2018 -1.06% 8.42% 0.4409 0.9 0.1 2.62% 0.0030903 5.56% 12/1/2017 0.85% -1.17% 8.19% 4.01% -1.12% 2.10% -17.35% 6.20% 4 12/1/2017 -1.17% 8.19% 0.4719 0.8 0.2 2.45% 0.0023273 4.82% 11/1/2017 -11.66% 1.66% 0.59% 7.58% 3.37% 5.01% -6.11% 2.67% 5 11/1/2017 1.66% 0.59% 0.4968 0.7 0.3 2.27% 0.0017907 4.23% 10/1/2017 3.91% 9.68% 1.80% -3.27% -0.47% -5.10% -14.49% -1.37% 6 10/1/2017 9.68% 1.80% 0.5011 0.6 0.4 2.10% 0.0014806 3.85% 9/1/2017 -2.12% -5.66% 8.77% 3.17% -1.09% -1.40% -3.25% 10.28% 7 9/1/2017 -5.66% 8.77% 0.4693 0.5 0.5 1.93% 0.0013969 3.74% 8/1/2017 3.70% 10.27% -5.32% 0.41% 9.31% 2.39% 3.97% -1.44% 8 8/1/2017 10.27% -5.32% 0.4026 0.4 0.6 1.75% 0.0015397 3.92% 7/1/2017 -3.40% 3.27% -2.65% 8.37% 6.72% 4.21% 2.80% 4.66% 9 7/1/2017 3.27% -2.65% 0.3217 0.3 0.7 1.58% 0.0019090 4.37% 6/1/2017 -1.62% -5.33% 9.11% -4.25% 9.52% -1.07% -2.94% 1.85% 10 6/1/2017 -5.33% 9.11% 0.2460 0.2 0.8 1.40% 0.0025048 5.00% 5/1/2017 1.11% 6.34% -5.01% 2.80% -8.64% 1.64% 1.98% -3.02% 11 5/1/2017 6.34% -5.01% 0.1833 0.1 0.9 1.23% 0.0033270 5.77% 4/1/2017 8.60% -0.01% -3.27% -5.83% -0.81% -2.80% 1.78% -0.62% 12 4/1/2017 -0.01% -3.27% 0.1335 0.0 1.0 1.06% 0.0043757 6.61% 3/1/2017 7.35% 5.32% -3.18% -1.77% -5.26% -1.34% -0.58% -3.65% 13 3/1/2017 5.32% -3.18% 2/1/2017 -3.57% 12.89% 2.75% 2.35% 4.10% 4.79% 7.85% 1.03% 14 2/1/2017 12.89% 2.75% ORP 0.5011 0.6 0.4 2.10% 0.00148057 3.85% 1/1/2017 18.18% 4.77% 2.21% -8.19% -3.66% 4.19% 2.67% -5.40% 15 1/1/2017 4.77% 2.21% 12/1/2016 6.74% 5.33% 5.01% 6.97% -2.14% 1.96% 3.35% 6.56% 16 12/1/2016 5.33% 5.01% 11/1/2016 8.93% -2.66% 15.02% 4.93% 4.96% -4.27% -5.34% 6.50% 17 11/1/2016 -2.66% 15.02% 10/1/2016 0.81% 0.43% 3.91% -7.46% -10.49% -3.29% 2.35% 1.78% 18 10/1/2016 0.43% 3.91% 9/1/2016 25.28% 7.13% -12.13% -0.67% 2.42% 2.79% -1.24% 3.40% 19 9/1/2016 7.13% -12.13% 8/1/2016 -1.77% 1.81% 5.90% -4.61% 5.42% 2.81% -3.13% -1.85% 20 8/1/2016 1.81% 5.90% 7/1/2016 1.68% 9.01% 1.35% -0.77% 19.89% 1.09% 0.81% -2.24% 21 7/1/2016 9.01% 1.35% 6/1/2016 1.55% -3.68% -5.97% 9.71% -16.54% 4.48% 6.39% 4.89% 22 6/1/2016 -3.68% -5.97% 5/1/2016 13.87% 6.53% 1.48% 0.98% 5.36% 1.98% 3.23% -1.15% 23 5/1/2016 6.53% 1.48% 4/1/2016 -12.58% -13.99% 3.35% -5.81% 5.64% -2.66% -1.78% 7.11% 24 4/1/2016 -13.99% 3.35% 3/1/2016 8.52% 13.33% 3.87% 6.60% 0.35% 2.52% 5.27% 15.78% 25 3/1/2016 13.33% 3.87% 2/1/2016 -9.27% -0.67% -6.59% 2.77% -5.00% -0.86% 3.31% -3.50% 26 2/1/2016 -0.67% -6.59% Summary Statistics AAPL WFC Average 2.80% 1.06% Variance 0.0040799 0.0043757 St. Dev. 6.39% 6.61% Covariance -0.001434 Rf 0.173% 0 In general formulas I'm familiar with: Vlookup, IF statements, some macros, pivot tables, speeding up efficiency using formulas, Statistical Analysis formulas, tables, graphs, etc.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

Compare and contrast the poems ""God's Grandeur" and "i thank You God for most this amazing".

Inactive
Philip L.
Answer:

The Grandeur Poem In a modern society, Gerard Hopkins and E.E. Cummings both acknowledge the fact that man is oblivious to Earth's nature and God's beauty in their respective poems "God's Grandeur" and "i thank You God for most this amazing." In modern times, man has a lack of awareness and appreciation of the beauty of nature and God that we once had. This oblivious nature of humans today is the central focus of both poems. Both poems rely on rhyming pairs at the end of lines and imagery to show the oblivious nature of man towards nature. Even though they both use rhyming to display the beauty of nature, the specific rhymes they use to show how man does not appreciate nature is different between each other. Both poems display imagery of nature throughout, but Hopkins's can use a darker approach when conveying the images which ends up being more effective. Lastly, Cumming's uses syntax and diction to describe man's lack of attention to God, whereas Hopkins's uses symbolism to get his point across. Overall, Gerard Hopkins's "God's Grandeur" does a better job of conveying the theme of man's lack of appreciation towards the beauty of nature and God through his use of more powerful rhyming pairs, darker imagery, and symbolism. The rhyming pairs that Hopkins uses in "God's Granduer" tends to describe man's lack of connection with nature. For example, one rhyming pair he uses is "trod" and "shod" (5, 8). According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "trod" is a footprint, and "shod" is "a plate of iron fastened upon the heel of the shoe to protect it from wear." When this rhyming pair is paired up together, it describes the fact that so many people have left footprints in the Earth through its landscape, and yet they wear "shods" or shoes which prevent them from truly feeling Earth's landscape under their bare feet. The fact that man now are wearing shods just to protect our bare feet from the Earth shows a disconnect between man and nature. Another rhyming pair Hopkins uses is "toil" and "soil." (6,7) When he uses this pair, he is talking about men traversing the Earth. The definition of toil is "a struggle" (OED), so the fact that man is "struggling" through the "soil" is a sad when Earth is meant to be embraced, not struggled through. E.E. Cummings uses rhyming pairs as well in "i thank You God for most this amazing" to describe how amazing nature can be. For example, he uses the rhyme pair of, "seeing" and "being" (9, 11) to describe how "seeing" nature is "being" alive. This rhyming pair emphasizes how looking at nature can invigorate a man with life. Without seeing nature, human beings aren't truly "being" alive. Cummings also uses the two words "amazing" and "everything" (1, 3) to describe how awe-inspiring nature can be; "everything" around us is "amazing" to look at. Even though both Cummings and Hopkins are alluding to nature with the rhyming pairs, what the rhymes describe are different. Hopkins is tackling the theme of man's obliviousness head on, whereas Cummings describes the beautiful aspects of nature that man are missing out on. This direct approach that Hopkins uses works much better than Cummings's description of nature. Cummings's tries to make the audience realize the grandness of nature whereas Hopkins directly implies that man is "toiling" in the "soil" of the Earth, and this is not acceptable. The fact that we hide behind shods in our shoes to not feel the Earth is just as unacceptable; the Earth was meant for man to appreciate it and man should feel the Earth beneath his feet. Hopkins's directness is so much better at showing why man shouldn't hide from nature, and should go out there and embrace it. Imagery displayed within E.E. Cumming's poem is straightforward, but helps show the beauty that man now take for granted in their everyday lives. Cummings starts off his poem by saying "i thank You God for most this amazing/day:for the leaping greenly spirits of trees/and a blue true dream of sky; and for everything/which is natural which is infinite which is yes" (1-4). The descriptions of the trees "leaping" and the pure blue sky paints an image of nature that people may not always think of when they're outside with nature. People continue on with their day and don't even pay attention to the blue sky that may be upon them; Cummings reminds people of the beauty of a "blue true sky" (3) up in the air that they forget about. "Leaping greenly spirits of trees" (2) makes trees feel as if they're just as alive as we are on Earth. Cummings follows up these beautiful images of the sky and trees with an image about the vastness of Earth we take for granted as well. He states that "this is the sun's birthday; this is the birth/day of life and of love and wings: and of gay/great happening illimitably earth" (6-8). The first lines give a sense of brightness and warmth upon Earth that we feel which bring us life. The most important part of this stanza though is when he says there is a "great happening illimitably earth" (8). According to the Oxford dictionary, illimitably means "without limitation or the possibility of limit." By saying Earth is without limitation, as in how big Earth is, an image of the Earth being so massive, and being illuminated by the sun comes to mind. The Earth is so large, and filled with many sights to see, but people of modern times don't think of these things in day to day life. Overall, Cumming's imagery tends to remind us and paint a picture of the beautiful Earth is that we take for granted. He wants us to see these images that he sees every day, which relates back to theme of man having a disconnect with nature. The fact that he needs to paint these pictures for us to appreciate nature shows the disconnection that man has. "God's Grandeur" uses complex imagery throughout the poetry to show man's lack of concern for nature. When Hopkins is discussing men roaming across its land, he says that "Generations have trod, have trod, have trod;/And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil;/And wears man's smudge and shares man's smell: the soil/Is bare now" (5-8). As more and more men throughout time have walked through Earth's lands, he has "seared" or "withered" (OED) away the land by creating paths for trade. Images of man walking on the paths and not even considering that they're ruining the Earth displays the disconnect with nature that man suffers. As man also continues to walk through the paths they created, they leave in the Earth's ground a "smudge," or a "dirty mark," (OED) as they go, leaving the soil bare as generations continue walking these same paths. This dark imagery shows the ground in a poor state from what we, man, have caused due to our lack of appreciation for the nature around us. Had man embraced the soil they walked on, they would not have left such a everlasting smudge of negativity within the Earth. Hopkins's imagery of the negative impact that man played on Earth's soil contrasts Cumming's imagery of the beauty of Earth greatly. They are two opposite images, but they're both trying to change man's perspective on nature from an oblivious mindset to a more appreciative mindset. Hopkins's method of imagery is better at conveying the theme because it pinpoints humans directly as the reason why this Earth's soil can be so bad now. We are the cause of it, and although E.E. Cummings makes you want to appreciate nature for its grand appearance, it is not as powerful as Hopkins's method of saying how much we have tarnished the Earth. If we realized how much the Earth was destroyed because of our actions, humans would step back and look at nature for what it is. Only then could people really appreciate the beauty of nature. Not only is nature being unappreciated by humans, but God is going just as unnoticed as nature is in modern times. By using different methods in their poems, they both place emphasis on God in their life in different ways. Cummings places emphasis on God through syntax and diction when he starts off his poem by saying "i thank You God for most this amazing/day" (1-2). By capitalizing the word "You," it shows that there is a sense of power with the being he is talking about; in this case it is God. He also places this at the beginning of the poem to emphasize the fact that all the pictures of nature he is going to paint is because of God. Also, when Cumming's says "how should tasting touching hearing seeing/breathing any-lifted from the no/of all nothing-human merely being/doubt unimaginable You?" (9-12) he is baffled how man can have six senses conceived from nothing at all, and yet people still "doubt" there is a God. His play on diction with the capital "Y" in "You" shows that he is referring to God when he is questioning our doubts in God. Once again, Hopkins's is able to top Cummings by using skillful symbolism when he says "The World is charged with the grandeur of God/…Why do men then now not reck is rod?" (1, 4). As stated in "Nature and Wise Vision in the Poetry of Gerard Manley Hopkins," the word "'rod' is synonymous with 'scepter'" (Katharine). This raises the question over why "the destructive blindness of humanity" (Katharine) is so uncaring towards God; the being who holds the scepter of power that created us and this Earth. This also connects with his use of the word "toil" since we are so "blind" to God and nature, we start to simply "toil" over the "soil" without any afterthought. Cumming's diction is more confusing and unclear compared to the symbolism of a rod being divine power. Cumming's tried to make a clever play on words but it just doesn't work to the effect of asking why people deny the scepter that is in God's hands. It is clear that both poems allude to the fact that humanity now lack both an appreciation of God and an appreciation for the beautiful green Earth he has created for us. E.E. Cumming's "i thank You God for most this amazing" and Gerard Hopkins's "God's Grandeur" both use imagery and rhyming pairs to speak of man's lack of admiration of nature, but they speak of it in different ways. Cummings used bright, positive rhyming pairs and imagery to help man "see" the nature we are oblivious to. Hopkins's showed how man has ruined the soil of Earth through imagery and how we avoid the Earth beneath our feet through rhyming pairs. Hopkins's wants us to realize how we are negatively oblivious to these things and change our view on nature. When Cummings and Hopkins spoke about God, Cummings used emphasis on his diction and syntax to question why we no longer admire God as we once did. Hopkins went with symbolism to question why men no longer care for God's power. Overall, Hopkins's was the better poem to portray humanity's obliviousness towards God and nature. His direct approach, attacking humans directly instead of trying to point out the beauty of nature works much better. Pointing out how we destroyed the soil, is a better advocate for changing a person's viewpoint than simply saying "look how beautiful this part of nature is." Although both poems advocate for the same ideas, Cummings comes up short when compared to Hopkins's "God's Grandeur." Works Cited Bubel, Katharine. "Nature and Wise Vision in the Poetry of Gerard Manley." Renascence 62.2 (2010): 117,140,174. ProQuest. Web. 07 Apr. 2014. E.E., Cummings. " i thank You God for most this amazing." Literature Approaches To Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Ed. Robert DiYanni. 2nd ed. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2008. 787. Print. Gerard, Hopkins. " God's Grandeur." Literature Approaches To Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. Ed. Robert DiYanni. 2nd ed. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2008. 809. Print. "Illimitably." The Oxford English Dictionary. 2nd ed. 2013. OED Online. Web. 07 Apr. 2014. Robert, DiYanni. Literature Approaches To Fiction, Poetry, and Drama. New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2008. Print. "Seared." Def. 1. The Oxford English Dictionary. 2nd ed. 2013. OED Online. Web. 07 Apr. 2014. "Smudge." Def. 1a. The Oxford English Dictionary. 2nd ed. 2013. OED Online. Web. 07 Apr. 2014.

Subject: Algebra

TutorMe
Question:

Find f(a), f(a+h), and the difference quotient (f(a+h)-f(a))/h, where h ≠ 0. f(X) = 8-9x f (a) = ? f (a+h) = ? (f(a+h) - f(a))/h = ?

Inactive
Philip L.
Answer:

f (a) = 8-9(a) = -9a+8 *multiplied -9 * a On the step above, "a" must be plugged in for "x" to get f(a). ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ f (a+h) = 8-9(a+h) = 8 - 9a - 9h * Used the distributive property to distribute the -9 to a and h = -9a - 9h + 8 *reordered for clarity On the steps above, a+h must be plugged in for x to get f(a+h). ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ (f(a+h) - f(a))/h = ? Given that we've already solved a+h and f(a), we can plug in our existing answers into the difference quotient formula. ((-9a - 9h + 8) - (-9a + 8))/h (-9a - 9h + 8) + 9a - 8) / h * distributed negative sign over -9a + 8 ((-9a + 9a) - 9h + (8 - 8))/h *simplify like terms -9h/h *divide h/h -9 is the answer.

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Philip will reply soon.
Contact Philip

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.
BEST IN CLASS SINCE 2015
TutorMe homepage
Made in California by Zovio
© 2013 - 2021 TutorMe, LLC
High Contrast Mode
On
Off