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Tutor profile: Rachel R.

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Rachel R.
Clinical Research Coordinator that's good at math
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Questions

Subject: Psychology

TutorMe
Question:

What theory of learning states that people learn acceptable and unacceptable behavior through interaction with culture and society? Give an example of the methods.

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Rachel R.
Answer:

Social Learning Theory. Albert Bandura performed his Bobo Doll Experiment to investigate this theory. In this experiment kids witnessed adults play with a doll. Some adults played aggressively with the doll and the kids that witnessed the aggressive behavior played aggressively with the doll. This shows that people learn by watching the behavior of people around them.

Subject: Cognitive Science

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Question:

What was the main thing scientists learned about memory from patient HM?

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Rachel R.
Answer:

The hippocampus was removed inpatient HM and he could not create new memories. Therefore, the researchers learned that the hypothalamus is crucial in transitioning short-term memory to long-term memory. However, it only affected his declarative memory, not his procedural memory. HM could learn tasks one day and return to do the same tasks the next. Without any memory of performing the task the day before, he would show improvement in the task. Researchers learned that procedural memory is stored differently than declarative memory.

Subject: Physics

TutorMe
Question:

How fast do you need to roll a ball off a 10-meter cliff so it lands in the center of a pool floaty that is 5.5 meters away?

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Rachel R.
Answer:

Step 1: Draw a picture. Pictures are extremely helpful in physics. Step 2: Write down the knowns and the unknowns. Assign variables to them. $$x$$ (horizontal distance traveled) = 5.5 m $$y$$ (vertical distance traveled) = 10 m $$g$$ (gravitational acceleration) = 9.8 m/$$s^2$$ $$v_x$$ (velocity inital of rolling) = ? Step 3: Write down equations you think will help. Here are some basic kinematic equations. 1. $$v=v_0 + at$$ 2. $$\Delta s = v_0 t + 1/2 at^2$$ 3. $$v^2 = v_0 ^2 +2a\Delta s$$ Step 4: Conceptualize the problem. Think about how variables change. $$y$$ velocity changes from 0 as the ball rolls off the cliff. So, $$v_{y0} = 0$$ $$v_{yf} = ?$$ Step 5: Check to see if you have enough information to start plugging numbers into the formulas. Let's use formula 2 and solve it in the y direction. 2. $$\Delta s = v_0 t + 1/2 at^2$$ The change in distance in the y direction is 10m ($$\Delta y = 10m$$), inital velocity in y direction is $$0m/s$$ ($$v_{y0} = 0$$), acceleration in the y direction is gravity ($$a = 9.8m/s^2$$), and all we are missing is time. Let's Solve. $$\Delta y = v_{y0}t +1/2 at^2$$ $$10 = 0(t) + 1/2 (9.8)t^2$$ Anything multiplied by 0 is 0. $$10 = 1/2 (9.8) t^2$$ Now it's just algebra $$20 = 9.8t^2$$ $$2.04 = t^2$$ $$t = 1.43s$$ Now we know the time! Great. Now let's find another formula to use to find the velocity of the ball roll. Let's use formula 2 in the x direction now. 2. $$\Delta s = v_0 t + 1/2 at^2$$ $$\Delta x = v_{x0}t +1/2 at^2$$ We know the velocity in the x direction does not change. Therefore the acceleration must equal 0. We just solved for time and we know the distance from the cliff to the floaty. Let's plug in the numbers. $$5.5 = v_{x}(1.43) +1/2 (0)(1.43)^2$$ $$5.5 = v_{x}(1.43)$$ $$3.85 m/s = v_{x}$$ And there it is! We found the velocity you need to roll a ball off the cliff so that it lands smack dab in the center of your pool float!

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