Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Katie S.

Inactive
Katie S.
Library and Information Professional
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

I'm writing a paper using APA style and I need help with formatting my paper and citations correctly.

Inactive
Katie S.
Answer:

I am happy to guide you to some helpful resources for using APA style for your writing assignment. Purdue University has an excellent Online Writing Lab (OWL) which shows in detail how to use various styles for academic papers. Below you'll find the link specific to APA style from Purdue's OWL website: For help with using the correct APA style format throughout your paper: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_formatting_and_style_guide/general_format.html For explanation of APA style for citing your references, including examples by resource type: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/apa_style/apa_formatting_and_style_guide/reference_list_basic_rules.html Is there any additional information I can provide?

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

I need to practice conducting reference interviews with library patrons. What are some tips or questions I should ask the patron during these interviews?

Inactive
Katie S.
Answer:

The reference interview is an excellent opportunity to gain more information from your library patron, so that you are better able to help them find the information they need. As you prepare for this experience, consider the following: When the patron approaches, greet them with a smile or friendly, open demeanor, and ask how you can help them. Listening to their initial question is key! It may be tempting to jump straight to the answer or resource you think the patron should be directed to, but hearing them out will ensure a more effective reference transaction. Next, try to rephrase their question to check for understanding, and to show you are listening fully to their request. If you are on the right track, and if appropriate, ask questions to narrow down possible resources that will help the patron with their request: -It sounds like you are interested in global economics. Is there a particular area of the world you are interested in or want to focus on when it comes to this topic? -Is this information needed for a class, or for your personal studies? -Do you need articles from scholarly journals? -Are there any journals, authors, or resources you already found that are helpful? After asking the appropriate clarifying questions, let your patron know your initial thoughts in terms of where they might find the information they need, or what resources you have that might be helpful. If their request is something quite involved that will take some extensive research on your part, ask the patron if they are willing to leave their contact info so you can get back to them (give an estimate of how long that will take). If you are unable to help them in terms of not having the resources needed in your collection, see what you can do to point the patron in another helpful direction, perhaps with the contact info of an individual or special library where they are more likely to find what they are looking for. End each interview by ensuring you've answered all the patron's questions, and that they are satisfied with the information you've provided or the plan to research on their behalf and follow-up at a later time.

Subject: Education

TutorMe
Question:

I need help writing a lesson plan for my coursework in the area of elementary education. I will be teaching a science lesson in the field to a group of 4th graders. How can I develop a great lesson plan for these students?

Inactive
Katie S.
Answer:

I am happy to give you some feedback regarding your question about lesson plan development! After consulting the rubric for this assignment your instructor has given you, you'll want to consider the following: Create an objective -What is the goal of your science lesson for this 4th grade class? In other words, what do you want your students to learn and gain from your lesson? -An objective should clearly state what students will learn from your lesson, as well as how that learning outcome will be observed and measured. -For example, say you want to teach your students about the life cycle of plants: "Students will observe the life cycle of plants by planting their own seeds, caring for them daily, and recording their bi-weekly observations of their individual plants in their science journals for 30 days." -In the above example, the objective states the goal (learn the life cycle of plants), and clearly describes how the teacher will measure students learning (through a hands-on experiment and student written observations). Note appropriate state curriculum guidelines -While developing your objective, also consider state curriculum guidelines and learning requirements you as a teacher and your students are subject to. -A great lesson (and objective) will align with state curriculum guidelines. -It is best practice to note which specific guidelines your lesson meets or aligns with. List materials -A great lesson plan will list all materials and requirements for a given lesson above the instructions. -This helps others understand what tools you will use to teach your lesson, and it's also a great practice for those who may want to adopt your lesson plan for use in their own classrooms. Step-by-Step Instructions -Detailed, step-by-step instructions will help you as the teacher deliver an organized an effective lesson for your students. -These details will clearly explain to those who may request to see your lessons (administrators, parents) what and how you will be instructing your students. -These details are also excellent for other educators who may want to utilize your lesson plans , if you are comfortable sharing. Engaging material -Use your creativity and knowledge of your students to develop the most engaging and exciting lesson as possible. -Students of all ages enjoy active lessons that allow for experimentation, collaboration, creativity, and more. -When you do your best to create an engaging lesson, and consider the interests of your particular group of students, you may find lesson planning to be a fun and creative process.

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Katie will reply soon.
Contact Katie

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.
BEST IN CLASS SINCE 2015
TutorMe homepage
Made in California by Zovio
© 2013 - 2021 TutorMe, LLC
High Contrast Mode
On
Off