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Syreeta B.
Playwright/Poet/Writing Workshop Leader
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Writing
TutorMe
Question:

Can you explain the difference between Passive and Active voice?

Syreeta B.
Answer:

A sentence written in passive voice has the action performed upon the subject. For example: "A cup of coffee was consumed by my best friend." A sentence written in active voice has the subject performing the action. For example: "My best friend drank her cup of coffee." A quick visual might also help: Passive Voice = Action > Subject Active Voice = Subject > Action

Film and Theater
TutorMe
Question:

In Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, what point in the play can be identified as Oedipus' "Moment of Recognition"?

Syreeta B.
Answer:

A Moment of Recognition (or Anagnorisis) is a moment in which the hero (often a "tragic hero") makes a critical discovery that completely alters the course of the play. In Oedipus' case it's the moment in which he discovers he's killed the king (his father) and married his own mother. This moment is easily confused for Peripeteia (or a moment in which the hero's fate is reversed). Some examples of Peripeteia include: The rich man becomes poor, the king becomes a peasant, even the moment in which Cinderella marries the Prince can be considered peripeteia. Conversely, a Moment of Recognition refers to the hero's own moral understanding of what has happened in the story, and how they may have influenced it for better or for worse. Typically, peripeteia follows a moment of recognition. Oedipus discovers that he's the reason for the curse, and has married and bore children with his own mother (Moment of Recognition). Immediately after that discovery, he "punishes" himself by inducing his own blindness and banishing himself to the wilderness (Peripeteia).

English
TutorMe
Question:

What's the difference between a slippery slope argument and a hasty generalization?

Syreeta B.
Answer:

Both are similar. However, the primary difference between the two is simply how the conclusion is formed. In a slippery slope argument A will eventually lead to B, which will eventually lead to C and D and so forth until eventually A equals Z. For example: "If we allow hover boards to be banned, then eventually scooters will be banned! And then before you know it all bicycles, skateboards and rollerblades will be banned!" In this case the conclusion is dependent upon the premise that A eventually equals Z. First, it's hover boards. Next, scooters. Until finally all bicycles, skateboards and rollerblades are banned. Therefore, A (banned hover boards) equals Z (banned everything else). A hasty generalization, on the other hand, simply lacks sufficient evidence to support it's claim. For example: "I know cats are evil because the first cat I ever petted scratched my arm!" A bit of a silly example, but it illustrates the point. This person is making a broad generalization about all cats based on one specific experience they've had with one specific cat during one specific point in time. Even if they were able to prove the claim that "cats are evil" they'd have to base it on more concrete and relevant evidence. Perhaps visiting different animal shelters to interact with different kinds of cats, and evaluating their behavior over time. Maybe even interviewing different cat owners who've had a variety of different experiences with their cats. The main takeaway however, is this: In a slippery slope argument, A eventually equals Z through a small series of steps. A hasty generalization, on the other hand, blankets an entire group or type of experience based on one specific experience.

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