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Tutor profile: Amy S.

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Amy S.
MATESOL, writing tutor and ESL teacher for 5 years
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Questions

Subject: Spanish

TutorMe
Question:

My cat is very playful! I can say in Spanish that my cat is playful.

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Amy S.
Answer:

If you want to say your cat is playful, you can say: Es juguetón. (male) or Es juguetona. (female) Do you know how to say "play" in Spanish? Notice the root of the word playful -- jugar, which means "to play."

Subject: English as a Second Language

TutorMe
Question:

Asking someone to help or "making a request" can be a complicated thing to do in English! Below are three text messages that someone might send to make a request: 1. Hey, can you help me move this weekend? 2. Hey, I have a quick question. Could you help me move this weekend? 3. Hi there. I hope you're doing well! I was wondering, would it be possible to help me move this weekend? I totally understand if you can't! Look at the examples above and consider the difference between the three. - Who is each question intended for? What is their relationship? - How do the questions change? What do you notice about each question?

Inactive
Amy S.
Answer:

Asking someone to help or "making a request" can be a complicated thing to do in English! Below are three text messages that someone might send to make a request: 1. Hey, can you help me move this weekend? 2. Hey, I have a quick question. Could you help me move this weekend? 3. Hi there. I hope you're doing well! I was wondering, would it be possible to help me move this weekend? I totally understand if you can't! Question 1 is probably meant for a close friend, someone that I know well. Question 2, maybe I don't know this person as well, and so I make my question a little more polite. Question 3 is for someone that I don't have a close relationship to, or someone who is maybe my boss. Each question gets more and more polite, depending on the relationship. The questions also get longer. There are much more words before the actual request to be more polite. Question 3, which is the most polite, also has something after. Question 2 uses "could" instead of "can" in question 1. Question 3 uses "would it be possible." This question verb can change the politeness, too!

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

In her banger hit "These Words," Natasha Bedingfield sings: Read some Byron, Shelley and Keats Recited it over a hip-hop beat I'm having trouble saying what I mean With dead poets and drum machines What literary device does Natasha use in the first line of this verse? What is the purpose of the literary device in this context? (Hint: Listen to the whole song to help you understand context and purpose.)

Inactive
Amy S.
Answer:

Byron, Shelley and Keats are famous poets. Most of their poems were about love, or at least, most people consider them to be love poets. In this instance, Natasha Bedingfield utilizes the literary device of allusion. Authors use allusions to hint at a person, place, piece of literature or art that is important to their writing! Here, Natasha expects us to know that Byron, Shelley and Keats are famous love poets, and that she has tried to use their words to inspire her own love song, but with no luck. The message here is not even the impressive words of "dead poets" are enough for her to express her love!

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