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Tutor profile: Jasmin S.

Inactive
Jasmin S.
Personal Finance Editor at BuzzFeed; M.A. Behavioral Economics; B.A. Journalism
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Questions

Subject: Professional Development

TutorMe
Question:

What are four essential parts of a resume?

Inactive
Jasmin S.
Answer:

1. Contact information: This is where you'll include your phone number, email address, and URL to your portfolio, if applicable. You may also include your address here, but it isn't necessary. You should avoid including your address on your resume if you are applying for a job in another state, as your address could automatically exclude you from the application pool. 2. Relevant experience: This is where you'll list the roles and responsibilities you've had that are relevant to the job you're applying to. In some cases, your relevant resume experience should be tailored to the job you're applying for, much like a cover letter. 3. Skills/certifications: This is where you'll list both hard and soft skills that can help you stand out. It is also a good idea to use this space to list certifications or licenses you have obtained as they relate to the job you're applying for. 4. Education: Don't forget to include your university, degree, and expected graduation date. Students often leave out their expected graduation date, and it really gets under the skin of hiring managers! They don't want to have to guess when you'll be finished with your degree.

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

Turn the following sentence from passive-voice to active-voice: "Our marriage ended in divorce."

Inactive
Jasmin S.
Answer:

"We divorced."

Subject: Personal Finance

TutorMe
Question:

What are three ways you can improve your credit score?

Inactive
Jasmin S.
Answer:

1. Make consistent, on-time monthly payments on your debts: Your credit score is a measure of how responsible you are when it comes to paying back borrowed money. It tells lenders how likely you are to pay back your loan or debt. Making consistent, on-time payments toward your credit card, student loan, personal loan, or mortgage can provide this "evidence" of good money management. 2. Avoid closing credit cards: Your length of credit history makes up 15% of your credit score. As an example, when you close a credit card that you've had for 10 years—even if you've completely paid off that card—you're essentially wiping out that evidence of 10 years of good management clues. This can actually cause your credit score to decrease. Avoid closing credit cards even if you've already paid them off. Once you pay off a credit card, it's a good idea to keep it active by using it just once or twice a year on a small purchase you can easily pay off immediately. This will ensure your card remains active. 3. Decrease your credit utilization: The amount you owe in debt makes up about 30% of your credit score. Credit utilization is relative to the total amount of credit you have available. For example, if you have a credit limit of $10,000 and you spend $5,000, your utilization is at 50% and that's generally considered a high utilization. However, if your credit limit is $20,000 and you spend $5,000, your utilization is now only 25% and that's a much healthier utilization. A good rule of thumb is to always keep your credit utilization at no more than 30% of your total available credit. Paying off more than the minimum amount on your loans and credit cards each month can help you manage your utilization.

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