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Tutor profile: Kimberly M.

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Kimberly M.
Library and information science, Anthropology and Musicology, Spanish and English writing tutor
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Questions

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

Could you send me some good databases and key resources for Mayan music research?

Inactive
Kimberly M.
Answer:

There are several databases that you could search for information on Mayan music. Some of the resources are free (such as certain collections available at scielo.org, rilm.org), others need to be accessed through services that require a subscription (such as JSTOR and EBSCO). I also encourage you to search RILM for thesis that will also be available at Proquest. Most research on pre-Hispanic Mayan music has been limited to Musical iconography, or Archeaology and Organology. Sometimes music is included as part of larger studies on Mayan expressive culture, festival, or rituals, in Anthropology. Some other kinds of Mayan music, such as marimba, may not mention the term Mayan, see the example below written by Navarrete. You may find more references like Navarrete's article sources sources specific names of the languages and dialects which belongs to the Mayan family of languages. There are also a few sources on Renaissance and Baroque church music. I have provided you with a very basic bibliography with several different kinds of sources. I encourage you to check other free online sources as well. Many people have begun to post their dissertations, master's thesis, conference papers and articles on Research Net, and Academia.edu. "Archaeology Magazine" editors (2002) Secrets of the Maya. Hatherleigh Press, Long Island City, NY, ISBN 1-57826-123-6. Bourg, Cameron Hideo. (2005) Maya Music Now with Sound. MA Thesis, Louisiana State University. Cecil, Leslie G. and Pugh, Timothy W. Maya Worldviews at Conquest.University Press of Colorado. Cheong, Kong F. (2012) 'A Description of the Ceramic Musical Instruments Excavated from the North Group of Pacbitun, Belize', in Terry G. Powis ed., Pacbitun Regional Archaeological Project, Report on the 2011 Field Season. Institute of Archaeology, Belmopan, Belize. Hammond, Norman (1972) 'Classic Maya Music. Part 1, Maya Drums; Part 2, Rattles, Shakers, Raspers, Wind, and String Instruments'. Archaeology 25(2, 3): 124–131, 222–228. Ishihara, Reiko. (2009). Música para las divinidades de la lluvia: Reconstrucción de los ritos mayas del período Clásico Tardío en la Grieta Principal de Aguateca, El Petén, Guatemala. LiminaR, 7(1), 22-42. Recuperado en 01 de junio de 2021, de http://www.scielo.org.mx/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1665-80272009000100003&lng=es&tlng=es. Houston, Stephen et al. (2006) The Memory of Bones: Body, Being and Experience Among the Classic Maya. University of Texas Press, Houston, ISBN 978-0-292-71294-2. Looper, Matthew G. (2009) To Be Like Gods: Dance in Ancient Maya Civilization. U. of Texas Press, Austin. Mendieta, Gerónimo de (1870) Historia Eclesiástica Indiana (ed. Joaquín García Icazbalceta). México: Antigua Librería. Navarrete, Sergio, 2005, Los significados de la música. La marimba maya achí de Guatemala, Publicaciones de la Casa Chata, serie: Antropologías, historias, lenguajes, sociología, Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, México. LiminaR, 4(2), 138-140. Phillips, Charles and Jones, David M. (2005) The Aztec & Maya World: everyday life, society, and culture in ancient Central America and Mexico, with over 500 photographs and fine art images.Lorenz Books, London. Rodens, Vanessa (2006) 'U bah tu yal pat. Tambores de parche mayas prehispánicos'. Tradiciones de Guatemala 66: 51–62.

Subject: Music

TutorMe
Question:

Anthropology of Expressive Culture and Ethnomusicology both have their beginnings in Ethnology and Sociocultural Anthropology. Can you explain how these fields developed out of Ethnology, and Sociocultural Anthropology? Also can you show the similarities and differences between these three fields, in terms of theory, methodology, methods, and relevant fields of philosophy (i. e. ontology, aesthetics, etc.), and also connect them to other disciplines, (i. e. cultural studies, or folklore) with citations of relevant authors' publication?

Inactive
Kimberly M.
Answer:

As some of the most attractive expressions of Culture and Society, music, dance and poetry, as well as rituals, have been studied since before contemporary Anthropology of Music and Dance, and Ethnomusicology became formalized fields of study in the United States sometime between the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s. Beginning with Franz Boas' early field research with the kwakuitl in 1889, in British Colombia and then with other Northwestern Pacific Coastal peoples, Boas documented the expressive culture, which included dance, masks, ritual houses, myths and secret societies of indigenous people, as multiexpressive, and multivalent expressions, with links to beliefs and values that transcend the purely Aesthetic. Malinowski's Argonauts of the Western Pacific, provided Sociocultural Anthropology, with much of its methodology based in extended fieldwork expeditions (1922), observation techniques, and methods for ethnographies. However, a number of important Ethnologists, and between these two scholars four fields were established, which in varying degrees were also based in cultural relativism (contextualist approach to culture, cultural relativism, and the participant observation method of fieldwork). The next generations of students formally known as Anthropologists, such as Melville Hertzkovits, Ruth Landes, Zora Neal Hurston, Manuel Gamio, among many others, continued to study corporality music and dance, and Folklore. While Anthropologists of expressive culture, tended to study these expressions holistically, and instead of breaking down the arts into the same categories that are found in Western Aesthetics, within their cultural context, and as static or changing traditions that music be salvaged. Folklore as a separate discipline began to make significant contributions to performance studies, by combining precise work on style and variants of Aesthetic Expressions, such as poetics, and verbal arts (Mendoza 1936; Mendoza 1961; Lomax 1968 and 1974; Bauman 1974) , however, it wasn't until almost the late 1970s and 1980s when Folklorists, Anthropologists and Musicologist began to define a field known as Ethnomusicology, that studied performance practices, social norms, social structures, and values that connect to deep structures (Axiology, Ethics and Aesthetics) and gender (Herndon 1980; Blacking 1974; Behague 1984; Feld 1982). Most of the field methods and methodologies remained the same for Anthropologists of Expressive Culture, Music and Dance, howvever, through the work of Mantle Hood (1960), and other early Ethnomusicologists like Jaap Kunst (1955), music performance became an important part of many Ethnomusicologists research methodology as part of participant observation, which contrasts in many ways with the methodologies of Folklorists and Anthropologists of Music, and Dance, or Expressive Culture.

Subject: Anthropology

TutorMe
Question:

Anthropology of Expressive Culture and Ethnomusicology both have their beginnings in Ethnology and Sociocultural Anthropology. Can you explain how these fields developed out of Ethnology, and Sociocultural Anthropology? Also can you show the similarities and differences between these three fields, in terms of theory, methodology, methods, and relevant fields of philosophy (i. e. ontology, aesthetics, etc.), and also connect them to other disciplines, (i. e. cultural studies, or folklore) with citations of relevant authors' publication?

Inactive
Kimberly M.
Answer:

As some of the most attractive expressions of Culture and Society, music, dance and poetry, as well as rituals, have been studied since before contemporary Anthropology of Music and Dance, and Ethnomusicology became formalized fields of study in the United States sometime between the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s. Beginning with Franz Boas' early field research with the kwakuitl in 1889, in British Colombia and then with other Northwestern Pacific Coastal peoples, Boas documented the expressive culture, which included dance, masks, ritual houses, myths and secret societies of indigenous people, as multiexpressive, and multivalent expressions, with links to beliefs and values that transcend the purely Aesthetic. Malinowski's Argonauts of the Western Pacific, provided Sociocultural Anthropology, with much of its methodology based in extended fieldwork expeditions (1922), observation techniques, and methods for ethnographies. However, a number of important Ethnologists, and between these two scholars four fields were established, which in varying degrees were also based in cultural relativism (contextualist approach to culture, cultural relativism, and the participant observation method of fieldwork). The next generations of students formally known as Anthropologists, such as Melville Hertzkovits, Ruth Landes, Zora Neal Hurston, Manuel Gamio, among many others, continued to study corporality music and dance, and Folklore. While Anthropologists of expressive culture, tended to study these expressions holistically, and instead of breaking down the arts into the same categories that are found in Western Aesthetics, within their cultural context, and as static or changing traditions that music be salvaged. Folklore as a separate discipline began to make significant contributions to performance studies, by combining precise work on style and variants of Aesthetic Expressions, such as poetics, and verbal arts (Mendoza 1936; Mendoza 1961; Lomax 1968 and 1974; Bauman 1974) , however, it wasn't until almost the late 1970s and 1980s when Folklorists, Anthropologists and Musicologist began to define a field known as Ethnomusicology, that studied performance practices, social norms, social structures, and values that connect to deep structures (Axiology, Ethics and Aesthetics) and gender (Herndon 1980; Blacking 1974; Behague 1984; Feld 1982). Most of the field methods and methodologies remained the same for Anthropologists of Expressive Culture, Music and Dance, howvever, through the work of Mantle Hood (1960), and other early Ethnomusicologists like Jaap Kunst (1955), music performance became an important part of many Ethnomusicologists research methodology as part of participant observation, which contrasts in many ways with the methodologies of Folklorists and Anthropologists of Music, and Dance, or Expressive Culture.

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